Who Wrote The Rocking Horse Winner? (Question)

What is the irony in the Rocking Horse Winner?

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What is the purpose of The Rocking-Horse Winner?

“The Rocking Horse Winner” tells the story of a little boy who seeks to relieve his family’s financial worries by accurately predicting the outcome of horse races, a feat he achieves by riding his toy rocking horse for hours until he reaches a clairvoyant state.

Who published The Rocking-Horse Winner?

“The Rocking-Horse Winner” is a short story by D. H. Lawrence. It was first published in July 1926, in Harper’s Bazaar and subsequently appeared in the first volume of Lawrence’s collected short stories.

What is the name of Paul’s rocking horse?

Curious and somewhat unsettled by discovering his nephew’s certainty that a horse called Daffodil will win the Lincoln derby, Oscar determines to take Paul with him to the race. When Daffodil comes in first, Oscar decides to become betting partners with Paul and Bassett.

What killed Paul in The Rocking-Horse Winner?

Paul faces the sad tragedy that comes along when greed becomes unbearably controlling. The person that is responsible for the death of Paul in The Rocking Horse Winner is not actually a person at all, it is a thing; greed. Initially it would seem as if Paul’s mother is the person who leads to his impending doom.

What does Paul’s mother discover when she returns home?

Paul’s parents return home after midnight. Paul’s mother discovers that Paul is still riding his rocking horse in his room. Paul collapses with a brain fever, screaming, “Malabar!” For three days, Paul lies ill and unconscious in his room with his mother at his bedside.

What did Pauls mother lack?

Paul’s mother says she is “very unlucky” because she “married an unlucky husband”. This indicates that she does not take responsiblity upon herself, but instead blames others for her lack of happiness. Paul’s mother thinks that luck is “what causes you to have money”.

How does Paul bring luck to his family in The Rocking-Horse Winner?

Paul attempts to change his family’s luck by riding the rocking horse so that he can make them wealthy. The house is constantly whispering to Paul, “More money, more money There must be more money.” Lawrence uses auditory (sound) imagery to heighten the sense of the dramatic, pushing Paul to ride.

How much does Paul make on the Kentucky Derby?

The Story Behind Paul Lo Duca’s $80,000 Kentucky Derby Score.

What does the rocking horse symbolize?

Summing up the ideas of symbolism regarding the rocking horse, it can be multi-faceted. For example, it can symbolize Paul’s ideal of luck and need for his mother’s love, and it can also symbolize his death and undoing because he puts the need to “get there” on the horse above his own well-being.

How much has Paul decided to bet on Daffodil?

His uncle asked how much he was betting on Daffodil, and Paul replied three hundred pounds. His uncle thought he was joking. Paul explained that Bassett keeps it for him because they’re partners. He thought Bassett would be betting a hundred and fifty on Daffodil.

What horse first wins money for the uncle?

What horse first wins money for the uncle? Daffodil. What happened the first time the boy asks Bassett to place a bet? The horse loses.

Who is the antagonist in The Rocking-Horse Winner?

Hester. We list Hester as an antagonist here since it is her coldness and her greedy attitude towards wealth that competes with Paul’s desire for her love. Ultimately, Paul is unable to overcome her coldness and dies.

How is Paul’s death symbolic?

In The Rocking Horse Winner, Paul’s death symbolizes the bottomless greed that materialistic people like Hester have and the lengths to which children will go to get affection and love from their parents. He was obsessed with being considered lucky by his mother so that she would love him and show him affection.

How old is the boy in the rocking horse winner?

Rocking Horse Winner is a dark, atmospheric and complex psychological British drama, adapted from DH Lawrence’s story about Paul, a young boy ( a 10 year-old John Howard Davies) who receives a rocking horse for Christmas and soon learns that he is able to pick the winning horse at the races – to the delight of his

What type of society does Lawrence portray in The Rocking Horse Winner?

Lawrence uses the whisperings to show that in a capitalist society people are greedy. They are tormented by the want for more money and are never satisfied. ”The Rocking-Horse winner” is ”a symbolic formulation of social life in the grip of capitalism” (Watkins 295).

The Rocking-Horse Winner – Wikipedia

D. H. Lawrence’s short story ” The Rocking-Horse Winner ” is set in the American West. It was initially published in Harper’s Bazaar in July 1926, and then included in the first edition of Lawrence’s collected short tales, which was released in 1927. It was adapted into a feature-length film directed by Anthony Pelissier and starring John Howard Davies, Valerie Hobson, and John Mills, which was released in the United Kingdom in 1949 and in the United States in 1950. The film was a critical and commercial success in both countries.

Plot summary

The plot of the novel is around a young middle-class Englishwoman who “had nothing go right.” Even though she appears to be successful, she is plagued by a sense of failure; her spouse is an untrustworthy individual, and her career as a commercial artist does not provide her with the income she desires. The family’s expenses outweigh their income, and an underlying sense of financial insecurity permeates the home. Her children, a boy named Paul and his two sisters, are acutely aware of her concern, and they claim to be able to hear the home murmuring, “There has to be more money.” Paul tells his Uncle Oscar Cresswell about his horse-racing wagering with Bassett, the gardener, and how he lost.

In other cases, he declares that he is “certain” of a winner for an upcoming race, and the horses that he identifies go on to win, often against incredible odds.

  1. When Paul and Oscar win additional money, they prepare to give the mother a present of five thousand pounds, but the gift just allows her to spend even more money.
  2. His mother hurries home from a party because she is worried about his health and uncovers his secret in the process.
  3. Paul will be out of commission for the whole Derby day.
  4. The odds are fourteen to one.
  5. I am so fortunate!
  6. However, the kid passed away in the middle of the night.

My God, you’re a good girl. He’s better off out of a life where he rides his rocking-horse around the track looking for a winner, poor devil, poor devil.”

Characters

In this story, Paul is a little kid who observes that his mother does not care about him and his sisters, despite the fact that she “loves” them. Following the gift of a rocking horse for Christmas, he begins to ride it frequently and discovers that he has the ability to predict which horse will win the next big horse race. Hester is the mother of Paul. As a result of discovering that her spouse is not fortunate and does not earn enough money, she feels “dissatisfied with her marriage.” Bassett is a family friend and the family gardener.

Oscar Creswell is Paul’s uncle as well as the brother of his mother.

For Paul’s mother, I signed the legal documents authorizing her to receive “one thousand pounds at a time, on the mother’s birthday, for the following five years.” Oscar joins together with Paul and Bassett to form a partnership.

Themes

Lawrence claims in his novel that money and love are incompatible with one another. Hester places undue pressure on Paul to fulfill her materialistic aspirations. Lawrence says that external sources of happiness, such as money and good fortune, cannot provide happiness; rather, happiness must come from inside. By exposing the absence of love in materialism, Lawrence suggests that happiness must come from within. The contrast between Hester’s greed and Paul’s kindness draws attention to the conflict that exists between materialism and love.

Standard edition

  • The Woman Who Rode Away and Other Stories (1928), edited by Dieter Mehl andChrista Jansohn, Cambridge University Press, 1995, pp. 230–243, ISBN 0-521-22270-2
  • The Woman Who Rode Away and Other Stories (1928), edited by Dieter Mehl andChrista Jansohn, Cambridge University Press, 1995, pp. 230–243, ISBN 0-521-22270-2

References

  • Foster, Thomas C., “How to Read Literature Like a Professor,” “The Rocking-horse Winner,” and “How to Read Literature Like a Professor II.” Online version of Magill Book Reviews (1990): Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost. Accessed on October 24, 2011.

External links

  • The whole text of “The Rocking-Horse Winner” is available at The Short Story Project.

A Summary and Analysis of D. H. Lawrence’s ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’

A classic short tale is read aloud by the author. It was initially published in 1926 as a short tale by D. H. Lawrence, titled ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner.’ It is a narrative about luck, money, and success, as well as the perils of following after these things and putting too much of one’s faith in these things. However, it is still unclear as to how we should analyze and interpret the tale. In this piece, we’ll provide some preliminary thoughts on how to approach a study of this famous D. H. Lawrence story.

  • Summary: The story revolves on a small child named Paul who desires to earn money for his mother and who succeeds in doing so by riding his rocking-horse until he achieves a state of near frenzy and is able to correctly predict the name of the horse that will win the next important race.
  • At some point, though, he becomes enthralled by his rocking horse to the point where he collapses and passes away as a result of the news that he has won a big sum of money from his last wager.
  • It’s impossible to say for certain, but one possible interpretation of ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’ is that if you put all of your attention into accumulating fortune, it will ultimately lead to your demise.
  • Lawrence’s short story may be analyzed in a variety of ways, and this is only one of them.
  • In his book Lacan and Literature: Purloined Pretexts, Ben Stoltzfus notes that Paul, a preadolescent child, spends a lot of time alone in his room riding the horse, and that he rides it so frantically that he ends up falling into a state of trance while riding the horse.
  • So, is riding a rocking horse intended to be a Freudian sexual code, or is it something else entirely?
  • H.
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To read ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner’ as a cautionary tale about the dangers of’self-pollution’ seems overly simplistic, but it is possible that this interpretation is connected to the interpretation offered above, and that Lawrence is attempting to draw a parallel between sexual desires and the pursuit of wealth.

  • How should we interpret it?
  • However, he is ultimately overpowered by his own achievement and the thrill that it causes, and he passes away.
  • What is the importance of the names of the winning horses in Lawrence’s account, and how should we interpret them?
  • Are there any indications that Lawrence introduced this name into his novel in order to infuse a degree of realism into his magical fiction?

It is considered to be one of D. H. Lawrence’s best works of short fiction. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, courtesy of Clem Rutter’s rocking horse from 2014.

The Rocking-Horse Winner

Synopsis Within a short period of time, the British writer D. H. Lawrence (1885 1930) made a name for himself as the author of groundbreaking and controversial books such as Lady Chatterley’s Lover and Women in Love, among others. However, Lawrence’s interest in the odd and extraordinary persisted throughout his career, and this fascination manifested itself in a diverse collection of stories that mirror many of the problems that he addressed in his mainstream fiction. The ghost book, among other anthologies, featured several of Lawrence’s strange tales, which were commissioned by Lady Cynthia Asquith for inclusion (1926).

  • Although “Glad Ghosts” is a compelling narrative in which a poorly disguised version of Lawrence himself appears as a character, Asquith had already rejected an earlier submission by Lawrence, “Glad Ghosts.” Lawrence’s ghost stories are frequently characterized by complicated love triangles.
  • Lawrence died in 1962.
  • S.
  • Joshi, a major specialist on strange fiction and the author of Unutterable Horror: A History of Supernatural Fiction, is the editor of the anthology.
  • T.

The Rocking-Horse Winner

English1493682814 D. H. Lawrence’s short tale “The Rocking-Horse Winner” is set in the American West. “I’ve had no luck,” says the protagonist of the narrative, a young middle-class Englishwoman. A sense of failure haunts her despite her apparent success; her spouse is a ne’er-do-well and her career as a commercial artist does not provide her with the income she would want. The family’s spending surpasses its income, and there is an underlying sense of financial insecurity throughout the home.

  1. By betting with his pocket money, he has amassed three hundred twenty pounds in profit while saving the same amount.
  2. Several wagers are placed on the horses named by Paul by his uncle Oscar and his friend Bassett.
  3. Paul is disappointed, and he works harder than ever to be “fortunate.” Paul is keen to find out who will be the winner of the Kentucky Derby as it approaches.
  4. He has been spending hours riding his rocking horse, sometimes all night, until he “gets there,” into a clairvoyant condition in which he can be certain of the identity of the winner, a process that has taken him months.
  5. Bassett has been informed by Cresswell and has placed Paul’s wager on Malabar at a fourteen-to-one odds.
  6. Is it possible that I never told you?
  7. The kid passes away in the middle of the night, and his mother overhears her brother say, “Hester, you’re eighty-odd thousand to the good, and a miserable devil of a son to the bad.

My God, you’re a good girl. But, poor devil, poor devil, he’s better off out of a life where he rides his rocking horse about looking for a winner than remaining in it.”

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ISBN-13: 9781493682812
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 11/04/2013
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 751,910
Product dimensions: 5.06(w) x 7.81(h) x 0.07(d)

About the Author

The date of his birth was September 11, 1885. Death occurred on March 2, 1930. Birthplace: Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, England, United Kingdom Death took place in the French city of Vence. Educated at Nottingham University College, where she received a teacher training diploma in 1908.

Customer Reviews

It was in July of 1926 when the novel “The Rocking-Horse Winner” by English author D. H. Lawrence was first published. D. H. Lawrence, an English novelist, wrote the short tale ” The Rocking-Horse Winner” in July of 1926, and it was published in The New Yorker in August of that year. It was first published in the journal Harper’s Bazaar, and then subsequently included in a compilation of Lawrence’s short tales with other works from the same publication. Lawrence appears to be doing so in this narrative.

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Start your free 48-hour trial today to have access to this and hundreds of other answers. Enjoy eNotes without interruptions and cancel at any time. Get Free Access for the Next 48 Hours Are you already a member? Please log in here. D. H. Lawrence, an English novelist, wrote the short tale ” The Rocking-Horse Winner” in July of 1926, and it was published in The New Yorker in August of that year. It was first published in the journal Harper’s Bazaar, and then subsequently included in a compilation of Lawrence’s short tales with other works from the same publication.

Because she places a high value on money above everything else in her life, including her husband and children, the mother in the story, Hester, creates a situation in which her young son, Paul, feels compelled to force himself to ride his little rocking horse until it takes him to “where there is luck,” as the story’s title suggests.

  • She also stated that wealthy people can lose their riches.
  • Paul is very aware of the “whispers” around the family about the need for more money, and he is also acutely aware of the creditors who write to his mother demanding payment.
  • In the end, he dies after learning that he has won a large sum of money in the most recent horse race, which he does not understand.
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What connection do Paul and the author of “The Rocking-Horse Winner” have? What in the story can be used to answer the above question?

According to the evidence available, there appear to be several similarities between D.H.

Lawrence’s life and his fable-like novel, “The Rocking Horse Winner.” Both D.H. Lawrence and his fictional character Paul have a strong desire to win the approval and love of their respective moms. Among addition, there is a growing awareness of financial plight in the.

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Start your free 48-hour trial today to have access to this and hundreds of other answers. Enjoy eNotes without interruptions and cancel at any time. Get Free Access for the Next 48 Hours Are you already a member? Please log in here. According to the evidence available, there appear to be several similarities between D.H. Lawrence’s life and his fable-like novel, “The Rocking Horse Winner.” Both D.H. Lawrence and his fictional character Paul have a strong desire to win the approval and love of their respective moms.

Both the author and his character suffer from a sense of fatherlessness, but in somewhat different ways than one another.

More than that, Lawrence sees Paul’s death as a cautionary tale about what he believes is the “misdirection of the life energy” created by the societal restrictions of his day.

  • During D. H. Lawrence’s childhood, his father worked as a coal miner, and his mother, who came from a middle-class family that had fallen into financial ruin, supplemented the family income by working in the lace-making industry
  • In later years, his father worked as a coal miner, and in later years, his mother worked in the lace-making industry “There is “anxiety in the house,” according to “The Rocking Horse Winner.” There was never enough money to go around “in addition to this, if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me at [email protected]
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There is no evidence of parental influence.

  • Lawrence’s mother was the one who had the most effect on him, instilling in him a lifelong passion for reading. His desire to satisfy his mother was similar to Paul’s
  • In the short tale, the father travels “to town to some office,” but he is otherwise missing from the narrative
  • And

Desire to have the approval of one’s mother

  • Lawrence’s mother adored him, but he still craved her approval, and her love of literature had a significant effect on his writing. Lawrence was saddened when Paul’s mother died when he was twenty-five years old
  • As a result, Paul gets obsessed with gaining money in order to ensure that his mother is fulfilled and happy. When she informs him that she has married an unlucky spouse, Paul vows to make every effort to be fortunate. He explains to his Uncle Oscar why he is riding his rocking horse to win the race.

“I started it as a gift for my mum. After hearing her complain about her lack of luck due to her father’s bad luck, I reasoned that if I were lucky, it may cease talking.” Message about the squandered lives

  • Lawrence was more dissatisfied with his culture, which he perceived to be too preoccupied with money. For example, in Apocalypse(1921) he stated, “What we seek is to remove our false, inorganic ties, particularly those that are tied to money.” Nevertheless, when Lawrence was in the early stages of his career and his wife referred to him as “a walking phenomenon of suspended fury” because he needed money, Paul’s death and the enormous sum of money that he wins -£80,000 in 1930’s money, which would be worth over $2 Million today – are employed to illustrate both the futility of a preoccupation with money and Lawrence’s revulsion for a materialistic English society that kills value. Paul’s mother represents a member of this English culture, and it is her materialism that ultimately brings Paul to his death.

In the next hours, he neither slept nor recovered consciousness, and his eyes were the color of blue stones. When he dies, his mother, who has “always felt the center of her heart become hard,” stands at his bedside, “feeling her heart had gone, turned literally into stone,” from the beginning of the story. Her life has undoubtedly been a waste, since she has derived no benefit from Paul’s extraordinary efforts to give her with financial security and stability. “Misdirection of the life energy” is a technical term.

  • D. H. Lawrence believed that there are forces in the natural world that people may access, but that they are unable to do so due of adherence to cultural and social standards. He wrote about these forces in his novel The Waste Land. People might more easily achieve meaningful connections that offer them happiness and love if they were to tap into these energies
  • Paul taps into other forces, but his purpose is incorrect, and as a result, he is unsuccessful in his attempts. It is undeniable that his mother’s fixation with consumerism prevents her from having good connections with her children, and that her life energy as a mother is misdirected as well. Paul has gone beyond social limitations to strive to meet his wants in the absence of the usual mother-child attachment, but he has also tapped into certain impulses that are misdirected. One commentator believes that Paul’s death is an indictment of London’s “staleness, its walking dead, its mechanized ugliness,” and that his death is an indictment of the city’s “mechanized ugliness.”

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Amazon.com: The Rocking-Horse Winner: 9781493682812: Lawrence, D H: Books

D. H. Lawrence’s short tale “The Rocking-Horse Winner” is set in the American West. “I’ve had no luck,” says the protagonist of the narrative, a young middle-class Englishwoman. A sense of failure haunts her despite her apparent success; her spouse is a ne’er-do-well and her career as a commercial artist does not provide her with the income she would want. The family’s spending surpasses its income, and there is an underlying sense of financial insecurity throughout the home. Afraid that they can hear the house murmuring “There must be more money,” her children, a boy named Paul and his two sisters, think they can hear the house mumbling “There must be more money.” Paul tells his Uncle Oscar Cresswell about his horse-racing wagering with Bassett, the gardener, and how he lost.

  1. In other cases, he declares that he is “certain” of a winner for an upcoming race, and the horses he identifies go on to win the event, often against incredible odds.
  2. When Paul and Oscar win even more money, they arrange to give the mother a present of five thousand pounds, but the gift just allows her to spend even more money.
  3. His mother hurries home from a party because she is worried about his health and uncovers his secret in the process.
  4. Paul will be out of commission for the whole Derby day.
  5. When Paul is informed by Bassett that he has amassed a fortune of 80,000 pounds, he tells his mother: “Never told you, mother, that if I can ride my horse and get to where I’m going, then I’m totally certain – oh, without a doubt!
  6. I am quite fortunate!” “No, you never did,” his mother stated emphatically.

“My God, Hester, you’re eighty-odd thousand to the good, and a miserable devil of a son to the bad,” her brother says to her as the kid dies in the middle of the night. But, poor devil, poor devil, he’s probably better off out of a life where he rides his rocking horse about looking for a winner.”

LitCharts

Welcome to the LitCharts study guide on D. H. Lawrence’s The Rocking-Horse Winner. This guide will walk you through the novel. LitCharts are the world’s greatest literary guides, and they were developed by the same team who created SparkNotes.

Brief Biography of D. H. Lawrence

Lawrence grew up in a family with a lot of problems. As the son of a coal miner, he had few acquaintances and suffered from chronic illness. Eventually, he was able to get out of Eastwood and enroll at University College, Nottingham, where he received his teaching certification. Following graduation, Lawrence went to work as a teacher while continuing to write in his spare time. In 1914, he married Frieda Weekley, the former wife of his linguistics professor at Nottingham, and they had a child together.

Lawrence and Weekley left England after the war and lived in Italy, Sri Lanka, Australia, and New Mexico before returning to England.

In 1930, he passed away in France.

Historical Context ofThe Rocking-Horse Winner

Many historical events are not directly referenced in Lawrence’s novel “The Rocking-Horse Winner,” save for the broad backdrop of middle- and upper-class England and his belief in the dehumanizing effects of avarice in contemporary society, both of which are shown in the book. Lawrence’s corpus of work, on the other hand, was critical in the establishment of a free press in the United Kingdom. Penguin Books released an unedited edition of Lady Chatterley’s Lover in 1960, despite the fact that the book’s graphic nature violated the Obscene Publications Act of 1959 at the time.

Penguin was found not guilty by a jury, and Lady Chatterley’s Lover was released in an uncensored form as a result of the decision.

Other Books Related toThe Rocking-Horse Winner

Lawrence is most known for his novels Sons and Lovers, The Rainbow,Women in Love, and Lady Chatterley’s Lover, but he also wrote several short stories. He also wrote several short tales, such as “The Woman Who Rode Away,” “The Kangaroo,” and “Odour of Chrysanthemums,” as well as over 800 poems and two plays, all of which may be seen on his website. A number of other writers, including Thomas Hardy (author ofTess of the d’Urbervilles), Walt Whitman, and Herman Melville, were the subject of Lawrence’s critical writing (author ofMoby-Dick).

  • The Rocking-Horse Winner is the full title of this story. When it was first published: 1926
  • Modernism is a literary period. Short tale is the genre. The location is somewhere in or around Hampshire, United Kingdom. The climax occurs when Paul rides his rocking horse so hard that he falls off. Antagonist:Greed
  • Third-person point of view is used.

Extra Credit forThe Rocking-Horse Winner

The Extended Edition is a special edition of the book.

In 1949, a full-length film adaptation of “The Rocking-Horse Winner” was released. Section devoted to fiction. The tale was initially published in a Harper’s Bazaar edition in which it was adapted.

rockinghorse

The Rocking Horse Award Recipient D.H. Lawrence’s poem HomeSubject:Theme of capitalism in “The Rocking Horse Winner” (The Rocking Horse Winner) The Importance of Money in “The Rocking-Horse Winner” The Importance of Money in “The Rocking-Horse Winner” To the Depths of Capitalism, Lawrence, You’ve Got to Be Kidding Me! Amelia Bourdonnais contributed to this article. It is widely accepted that literature is intended to be read and that authors use literature as a way of sharing their own experiences and thoughts with their readers.

  1. Lawrence is regarded as a visionary thinker and a key role in the modernist movement, among other things.
  2. One of them is the short narrative “The Rocking-Horse Winner,” which he wrote.
  3. Lawrence takes aim at capitalism in his novel “The Rocking-Horse Winner.” He accomplishes this by dismantling the notion that if you are lucky, you will have money and, thus, be content.
  4. Similar to this, Lawrence demonstrates that the greed that permeates our society is also what leads persons to be dehumanized and to be considered less valuable than money.
  5. As the members of the household experience an underlying fear of losing their savings, Paul inquires of his mother about luck: “Is luck money, mother?” No, Paul, that is not the case.
  6. It is something that allows you to have money” (Lawrence841).
  7. Throughout the novel, money is only mentioned a few times.
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Paul’s concern with luck is emphasized in this passage by Lawrence’s use of repetition.

When Paul rides his giant rocking horse into space, he does it in such a fury that the small girls look at him strangely.

842) (Lawrence 842 ) Through the use of his rocking-horse, we are led to assume that Paul is aware of which horse will win the race.

Paul makes money through gambling, and he is successful because he is guided by some type of mysterious power to choose which horse to bet on.

Ironically, Paul’s so-called good fortune is also what ultimately leads to his death.

As a result, Lawrence draws a comparison between the never-ending need for money and the labor force.

Paul exhausts himself by riding his rocking horse all day and night, and he eventually succumbs to his injuries (course notes).

Is he successful because he is fortunate, or is he successful because he works really hard to achieve success?

“Mother, I never told you that if I can ride my horse and reach there, then I’m definitely certain- oh, I’m absolutely certain!” Is it possible that I never told you?

Take note of how Lawrence intentionally italicizes the words ‘get there’ and ‘I am lucky.’ A critique of capitalist society in which we are led to believe that everything is a game, that everything is possible, and that you could get fortunate is expressed in the novel “The Rocking-Horse Winner.” It condemns a culture that conceals the truth that you might lose your social standing and your whole life.

It is impossible to force or will luck in the way Paul is attempting to do (Humma 53).

As previously established, in “The Rocking-Horse winner,” D.

Lawrence attacks capitalism by utilizing the continual whisperings that the family hears to signify greed as a vehicle for his critique.

It penetrates the home that “there has to be more money!” (Lawrence 840).

The whisperings continue and become more audible as the narrative progresses.

They are tortured by the need for more money and are never happy with their lot in life.

In addition, D.H.

Paul earns enormous quantities of money via his bets and chooses to transfer money to his mother discreetly in order to assist her financially.

She is dissatisfied, and the whisperings become more audible once more.

When it comes to their tastes, the father’s is “always extremely gorgeous and costly in his choices, and his tastes are exactly the same as the mother’s” (Lawrence 840).

“The God-damn Bourgeoisie,” as Lawrence refers to it in his short tale, is an indictment of affluent society.

Due to our “swallowing the culture hook and becoming victims to a world we believe contains the secret to human pleasure,” the whisperings become increasingly loud (Watkins 295).

Although Paul dies with his family still thinking about money at the end: “My God, Hester, you are eighty-odd thousand to the good, and a poor devil’s son to the wicked,” they say (850).

Lawrence’s short tale also depicts a world where money is king and humans are relegated to a secondary position.

People are valued by the mother according on whether they are fortunate or not, and whether they have enough money or not.

People are pushed to purchase because they believe there is a problem and that some weakness must be concealed in order to live up to society’s standards.

Despite this, we do have a little bit of information on Bassett.

Also noteworthy is that Bassett does not hide behind his possessions because he is the only character in the film who does not own anything.

Due to his position as a gardener, he has no other assets but his person, which is hardly much in a capitalist society.

Despite the fact that the mother is present throughout the entire narrative, she is not identified until the very end (Evan 153).

The premise that capitalism drives individuals to be dehumanized and to value themselves solely on the basis of their worldly things and outward appearances is underlined throughout the book.

As a result, the children are under constant pressure to perform and earn money, even if this is never explicitly requested of them.

They are no longer considered children, but rather miniature’money-making machines’ in the making.

Lawrence criticizes capitalism by demonstrating that the desire for money that pervades Paul’s family, his withdrawal into a private fantasy world where one can force luck, and the dehumanization of the characters are all caused by capitalism.

It is the possessions of a person that are valued in a capitalist society rather than their own personhood.

Evan was published in Short Fiction: A Critical Companion (Short Fiction: A Critical Companion) in 1997, p150-157, 8 pages (Littoral Research Institute).

Erich Fromm, et al.

Web.

2010.

2010, accessed 23 Oct.

4.

Pan and published in Essays in Literature, Spring 78, Vol.

5.

D.H.

“The Rocking-Horse Winner,” a piece of fiction from Fiction 100.

Pearson/Longman, New York, 2010.

University of Houston Press, New York, 2010.

Daniel P.

Studies in Short Fiction, Newberry College, Summer 1987, Vol.

Lawrence’s ‘The Rocking-Horse Winner.’ ” The Literary Reference Center publishes in print.

Money has no effect on anyone’s attitude about it.

Some people are able to make ends meet with the amount of money they have, while others require additional funds.

Lawrence wrote “The Rocking-Horse Winner.” The majority of people required additional funds.

It should come as no surprise, then, that money is a central theme in “The Rocking-Horse Winner,” especially when one considers that D.

Lawrence grew up in a working-class family and in a poor neighborhood.

Paul’s mother did not care about her own children; she was more concerned with money.

They actually had enough money to pay for a few domestics and “felt themselves to be superior to anyone in the neighborhood,” according to the author (Lawrence 840).

There was a lot of tension in the household, as D.H.

Paul’s mother told him at one point that they didn’t have a car because they were poor, and that he should understand that.

The apostle Paul then draws a comparison between the words “luck” and “money.” Although Lawrence uses the term “filthy lucre” (841), it is noteworthy that lucre is indeed a slang term for money in this context.

If you’re fortunate, you have some money.

If you’re wealthy, it’s possible that you’ll lose your money.

taking his thoughts away from horseracing and the monetary rewards that his forecasts were bringing him, because he was confident that they were not guesses.

As with every gambler, Paul was persuaded that he had influence over, or even privileged information about, the outcome of the game.

Unfortunately, as a result of his gambling, Paul became ill long before he passed away.

Paul had become similar to his mother in that all he cared about was accumulating more wealth.

He was in desperate need of more.

He really handed her the most of the money he received as a prize.

As a result of his winnings, Paul’s behavior was even encouraged by his uncle, who assisted him in participating in horse-racing bets since he, too, was a gambling addict.

Paul was pleased with this since he believed that his expertise was required and desired.

They were constantly winning more money, but they were also constantly in need of more.

H.

Happiness, without a doubt, cannot be purchased with money.

D. H. Lawrence’s “The Rocking-Horse Winner” is one of the works cited. The anthology Fiction 100: A Collection of Short Fiction. James H. Pickering is the editor of the 12th edition. Longman Publishing Group, New York, 2008. Print pages 840-850.

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