How To Sell A Horse? (TOP 5 Tips)

It’s a good idea to place your listing on a reputable equine-selling website such as Horse and Hound. This site has large visitor numbers and is the go-to place for legitimate buyers. You could also consider advertising in popular magazines such as Horse and Rider.

What is the best way to sell a horse?

Some of the most popular classified websites to sell your horse include EquineNow, Dream Horse, and Equine.com. Don’t be afraid to use more than one website; in fact, more listings will likely generate more buyer leads.

How much can you sell a horse for?

The average price for a standard horse is around $3,000 to $5,000.

What to do with a horse you can’t sell?

3 Ideas when you can’t keep your horse

  • Sell the horse: If this seems too generic skip to #2 and #3. This one doesn’t seem creative but many people are in this situation.
  • Give the horse to a trainer. Now that’s creative!
  • Give the horse to a rescue. Some rescues take horses in that are not in trouble yet.

How do I price my horse?

“To get a dollar-value-per-point,” Michelle explains, “add up all the sales prices on the comparables and divide that number by the total number of points the comparables scored. Multiply the number of points your horse scored by the dollar-value-per-point and you have a good rough estimate of what your horse is worth.

Can you advertise horses for sale on Facebook?

Facebook has prohibited the sale of animals via the platform for several years but in April 2019 the policy was updated and they began to actively enforce it. We’re in dialogue with Facebook about the definition of brick-and-mortar entities because we know that none of you are selling horses from a shop front.

What makes a horse worth money?

Six main factors go into setting a price for your horse: age, height, intended job, temperament, performance record and soundness. There are always exceptions to the rule, but these are good general guidelines.

How much does it cost a month to own a horse?

Responses to a horse-ownership survey from the University of Maine found that the average annual cost of horse ownership is $3,876 per horse, while the median cost is $2,419. That puts the average monthly expense anywhere from $200 to $325 – on par with a car payment.

What does it cost to board a horse?

The average cost for horse boarding is $350 to $400 a month. This number can fluctuate depending on where you live, the facilities you’re interested in, and the type of board you choose.

Can I return a horse to a private seller?

If you rightfully reject the horse because it is not fit for purpose or of satisfactory quality you are not obliged to transport the horse back to the seller. It is for the seller to arrange for the horse to be collected at his or her own expense.

What does rehoming a horse mean?

Fortunately, there are plenty of good options for rehoming a horse. If you need to rehome your horse permanently, try selling it to a reputable buyer, donating it to an organization in need, or relinquishing it to a rescue or sanctuary.

How long after buying a horse can you return it?

When buying from a horse dealer what if any added rights do I have compared to buying private? If the horse does not meet with those requirements then the consumer is entitled to reject the horse and request a full refund within the first 30 days of taking possession of it.

How do I sell a horse on Facebook?

Selling animals isn’t allowed on Facebook Market Place or buy and sell group pages. This includes posting about animals for adoption. However, keep in mind that it’s okay to create a news feed post, or an ad about selling an animal or service on your own timeline.

Where can I advertise my horse for sale?

Where to list. The world’s largest horse marketplace is equine.com, which offers free advertising placement. Alternatively, you can select one of equine.com’s paid ad types, which place your listing directly in front of buyers.

Horse-Selling Strategies in a Buyer’s Market

In light of the recent economic downturn, selling a horse is not an easy task. Because it is a buyer’s market, you must be strategic in your approach to marketing your horse for sale. Courtney Cooper, an event rider who specializes in consigning sales horses and matching horses and riders, offers some wise words of wisdom on how to make the selling process as painless and efficient as possible for both the horse and the buyer. When it comes to selling horses, Courtney’s golden standards are to set reasonable expectations and to be upfront and honest.

“At the end of the day, individuals don’t want to spend their valuable time.

Whenever you’re selling a horse, treat a prospective buyer the way you would like to be treated if you were the one who came to look at the horse.”

Which Horse Would You Buy?

Selling a horse is difficult in the current economic climate. Because it is a buyer’s market, you must be strategic in the way you show your horse for sale to prospective buyers. When it comes to making the selling process as painless and efficient as possible, event rider Courtney Cooper offers some wise words of wisdom. Cooper specializes in consigning sales horses and matching horses with riders, among other things. Reality-based expectations and honesty are two of Courtney’s most important selling principles.

People desire to be treated fairly in all aspects of society.

Honestly Evaluate Your Horse

With the recent economic downturn, it is difficult to sell a horse. Because it is a buyer’s market, you must be strategic in how you show your horse for sale. Courtney Cooper, an event rider who specializes in consigning sales horses and matching horses and riders, offers some wise words of wisdom on how to make the selling process as painless and efficient as possible for both buyers and sellers. When it comes to selling horses, Courtney’s golden guidelines are to set reasonable expectations and to be completely honest.

People want to be treated fairly in all circumstances.

Price Him Appropriately

Once you’ve determined what your horse is competent at and what his maximum limits of ability are, it’s time to put a monetary value on your horse. It’s critical to keep any emotional sentiments out of the equation throughout this approach. Although he may be your greatest buddy, his worth is determined by objective characteristics in the eyes of a prospective buyer. In Courtney’s experience, “I get unrealistic folks on both sides of the coin-buyers and sellers,” she adds. “However, any horse is saleable if you price him appropriately and he’s in good health both mentally and physically.” It’s important to remember that the recent economic downturn has had an impact on the horse business as well.

  1. Horses are often worth 15 to 20% less than they were three or four years ago, according to industry experts “Courtney expresses herself.
  2. You must come up with a price that is appropriate for your individual horse and his talents at the time of the auction.
  3. There may always be exceptions to the norm, but these are sound general recommendations to follow in most situations.
  4. Even if you are presenting your horse as a “prospect,” if he is past the age of 10, he will cause some people to raise an eyebrow.
  5. Height: It may be tempting to increase the height of your 15.1-hand horse’s vital data by a few inches, but resist the temptation.
  6. Job that I want to do: Job performance is also a significant component in determining the price of your horse, and it is one that needs harsh honesty on your part.
  7. Temperament: Generally speaking, the calmer and saner a horse is, the higher the price tag.

An amateur doesn’t want to waste his time with garbage.

The Young Rider is looking for a skilled horse and is willing to put up with some misbehavior.

In most cases, the professional will choose the riders who are less rideable but more gifted “Courtney expresses herself.

If you want to make more money with your horse, it needs to have records, and if he has records, they need to be excellent records, according to Courtney.

But keep in mind that the consequence of doing so is that you’ll be able to receive less money for him when you sell him.

“There are certain horses in which you can deal with certain difficulties because they’re lowering a level or transitioning to a new profession,” she explains.

It is necessary to consider what your new profession would entail.” Gender and race are two characteristics that influence price that are slightly less relevant.

A little chestnut mare will be worth less than a small bay gelding, according to Courtney.

I don’t think it’s right or bad, but it is a reality.” You should also consider your location—if you’re in the center of a horse-producing region, your horse will most likely be able to fetch a somewhat higher price than if he were in a more remote place.

However, this information should only be used as a general guideline. The challenge, according to Courtney, is that you see what horses are marketed for, but that isn’t always what they’re selling for on the market.

Get the Word Out

It’s time to advertise your horse once you’ve determined what job you want to promote it for and established a price for it. Courtney recommends utilizing all available routes, including advertisements on internet and in print, as well as word of mouth. According to Courtney, “I’m a big believer in advertising because I don’t know what someone has for sale unless they tell me, and advertisements are the most convenient way to accomplish that.” “It’s critical, in my opinion, to get it out there wherever you believe your market is.

  1. You’ll be able to sell the horse.” The first step is to obtain high-quality photographs and video footage of your horse to use in promotional materials.
  2. “If he’s a pleasure horse, I prefer to see pleasure photos and video,” Courtney adds.
  3. Courtney is also not a fan of videos that have been manipulated.
  4. “He is under no need to be flawless in the video.
  5. I’d like to see him get a rail and put in more effort at the next fence.” Another important aspect of advertising is how you phrase your message.
  6. Make use of descriptive language, but avoid using ambiguous or flowery terms.
  7. For some, a four-foot jump is considered a significant distance.
  8. A two-foot-six leap is considered a significant jump for a rookie rider.
  9. “In response to your statement, ‘Can win the hack,’ I would want to inquire, “Has he won the hack?” Is he the winner of a hack at an A show?

Communicate with Buyers

When responding to inquiries from prospective purchasers, inquire as to the specifics of what they are searching for. And be forthright in stating if you believe your horse would be a good match for their requirements. ‘I don’t think my horse meets that description,’ you can respond. What’s the point of wasting time, both yours and theirs? Say something like, ‘Perhaps in the future, my horse will be that, but he isn’t that right now.’ The Junior Hunter who can step about at Ocala or Wellington is a totally different creature than the Junior Hunter who is showing at the smaller shows, according to Courtney.

In place of asking themselves, ‘What is the seller concealing?,’ the buyer believes, “She isn’t concealing anything, and I am free to make a decision.” If your horse is the only one you have available for sale, it is extremely critical to determine whether or not the prospective buyer is a good match for your horse.

  • I may begin with the quietest horse I have and work my way up from there.
  • Get a sense of what they’re seeking for by asking queries such as, ‘You’re looking for an upper-level prospect, are you?’ “Can you tell me what level you’ve ridden on?” He may be the best horse for the work, but if he is not the best horse for the job, he should not be hired for the job.
  • There’s no use in going on a tour of the house, no matter how beautiful it may be.
  • Even if you’re aware that your horse has minor navicular alterations that haven’t had an influence on his soundness, there’s no use in going through the trial procedure if the buyer isn’t willing to accept a horse with such difficulties.

If you’re communicating with the buyer, you may ask, ‘Is there anything I need to know from a vetting aspect that will be a deal breaker?’ or something along those lines. A lot of horses have jewelry that goes with them, and some people don’t want to think about such things.”

Make A Good First Impression

Once you have a prospective buyer booked for a trial ride, make certain that your horse is in peak condition when they arrive on the premises. In Courtney’s words, “treat it as if it were a job interview for your horse.” ‘Individuals seem to forget that, as much as they want to sell their horse, other people are interested in purchasing a horse.’ But they want a horse that is unique and will become their next best friend before they spend their money on him. They want to be smitten with him and marry him.

They shouldn’t have to make the effort to envision him looking better than he actually does.

” There is no excuse to display a sloppy-looking horse, regardless of whether it is a $500 horse or a $50,000 horse in the show ring.

It’s the initial idea you get of what this horse is supposed to be, and if it doesn’t match up with your mental image of what you said it was, you’re going to be starting from the bottom.” Courtney’s motto is “The horse needs to sell himself,” but in order for him to do so, you have to place him in the best possible position.

What More Can I Do?

Identifying what went wrong with prospective purchasers who tried your horse might be quite useful if you’re having trouble selling your horse for any reason. “Go back to the folks that tried him and ask them why they turned him down,” Courtney advises. “Ask them to give you their honest view. Occasionally, they may be able to provide you with some insight. A certain amount of guts is required in order to go back to someone and say, “I’m sorry it wasn’t the perfect horse for you, but could you please provide me with some insight into what you didn’t like or what you did enjoy?” The advertisement wasn’t precise enough, was it?” If you don’t have access to a professional, you’ll need to figure it out on your own.

  1. Alternatively, ‘I didn’t care for the fact that the horse was presented in a pelham.’ Some of the time, it boils down to the fact that they aren’t quite ready to make a choice.
  2. And you’ll be in a better position to determine how to proceed.
  3. Working under Michael Page in the hunter/jumper realm as well as training with eventing trainers Jim Wofford, Phillip Dutton, and Sally Cousins have given her a diverse range of horse expertise.
  4. She juggles horse training and competition with a booming company selling horses out of her C Square Farm in Nottingham, Pennsylvania, which she founded in 2004.
  5. They are primarily concerned with teaching and selling on their 20-acre farm, which has 14 stalls.
  6. ‘I’ve always had a passion for horse-related activities, including purchasing, selling, and training horses.
  7. We primarily sell to the eventing world, but we also sell hunters, jumpers, equitation horses, dressage horses, and foxhunters to other horse owners.
  8. “I came from a sales background, where I assisted individuals in finding solutions to their problems.

Do you intend to sell your horse at some point? Simply go toEquine.com, the flagship classifieds site of the Equine Network, and post your advertisement.

So You Want to Sell Your Horse on the Internet—Here’s How

You’ve come to the conclusion that it’s time to split ways with your horse and put him up for sale. Your friends are pressing you to place an ad for him on the internet, but where and how should you submit the ad? Once you know where to post an advertisement for your horse for sale on the internet, selling your horse will be a piece of cake. Follow our instructions to choose where to sell your property and how to build an advertisement that will attract potential buyers’ attention.

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Where to list.

Isequine.com, the world’s largest horse marketplace, offers free advertising space on its website, which is also available in other languages. Alternatively, you may choose from one of the paid ad kinds available on equine.com, which will put your listing in front of potential buyers. In addition to equine.com, numerous general classified websites (such as ashorseclicks.com and equinenow.com) as well as discipline-specific classified websites are available in the horse industry (such asbarrelhorseworld.comandreinersworld.com).

AIM Equine Network is a non-profit organization dedicated to the improvement of equine welfare.

Creating your ad.

Isequine.com, the world’s largest horse marketplace, offers free advertising space on its website, which is also available in other languages. Alternatively, you may choose from one of the premium ad kinds available on equine.com, which will put your listing in front of potential buyers directly and immediately. Other general classified websites (such as ashorseclicks.com and equinenow.com) as well as discipline-specific classified websites compete with equine.com in the horse trade (such asbarrelhorseworld.comandreinersworld.com).

AIM Equine Network is a non-profit organization dedicated to the improvement of equine health and well-being in the United States.

Photos and videos.

Isequine.com, the world’s largest horse marketplace, offers free advertising space on its website. Alternatively, you may choose one of the paid ad kinds available on equine.com, which will put your listing in front of potential purchasers. Other generic classified sites (such as ashorseclicks.com and equinenow.com) as well as discipline-specific classified sites compete with equine.com in the horse trade (such asbarrelhorseworld.comandreinersworld.com). Posting your horse for sale on a horse-specific website enhances the likelihood of selling your horse.

Responding with care.

It’s vital to understand that, while advertising your horse online might reach a large number of people, you may also encounter “tire kickers,” who inquire about your horse with no intention of purchasing it.

If you advertise your horse on social media, be wary of unfavorable remarks and do your best to answer in a professional manner; you don’t want your ad to be discredited as a result of a poor response.

9 Things I’ve Learned During My Years Selling Horses

“I purchased a project horse with the intention of reselling it, and I expect to earn a good profit from it.” “Unfortunately, my horse is becoming older, and I need to sell him before his value begins to plummet.” This horse has brought me to tears on so many occasions that I’ve given up. “It’s past time to find him a new place to live.” Whatever your tale, and regardless of whether you consider yourself an expert in horse selling or have no idea where to begin, it is universally acknowledged that selling horses is a difficult endeavor.

  • Clearly, there should be a book called Horse Selling for Dummies available.
  • We are selling live animals directly between vendors and owners, many of whom have no prior professional expertise and are participating in transactions for the first time.
  • Despite the fact that selling experiences seldom go according to plan, the film’s surprising story twist will wow its viewers just when they believe they have seen it all.
  • Let’s start with the dollar sign, shall we?
  • The worth of a horse is determined by the amount of money that a customer is prepared to spend on it.
  • First and foremost, it could be a good idea to get the assistance of a trustworthy buddy who can lead you through the procedure.
  • This alternative may appear frightening to those who are concerned about making a profit, as trust is a significant component in this selection.

My preference is to maintain the pricing of horses within a price range and only disclose an exact dollar value to a genuine customer who is dedicated to checking the horse out before purchasing it.

As we all know, the price of a horse may fluctuate dramatically depending on how quickly an owner wants his money returned.

If you are unsure of what price to set for your horse, conduct your research and look for comparable horses in the market to guide you.

Oh, and keep in mind that individuals are willing to bargain!

The Influence of Politics In my early days, I was that inexperienced rider attempting to sell my own horses in a market that was far larger than I could possibly compete with.

Afterwards, a few of years ago, I took my junior hunter horse to sell during the Wellington winter circuit, which is considered to be the center of horse sales in North America and maybe the globe.

When I originally entered the amateur owners category, I won a couple of classes and ended as a reserve champion in my first week of competition.

However, this is not the case.

Politics of the horse.

Instead of moaning about it, devise a strategy that best matches your needs while taking into consideration all of the aspects that influence this niche sector.

Know your horse, keep track of his or her show achievements, and understand where your horse belongs (and in whose hands).

Most likely not.

Related: 8 Things to Consider Before Purchasing a Horse in Europe.

Furthermore, it may be beneficial to have a new series of x-rays taken.

Additionally, it serves as a symbol of good faith to the buyer, and it will assist you in determining a price for the horse as a result of the radiological examination.

Whether you like it or not, appearances do matter.

Ordinarily, purchasers may test a couple of horses before making their final decision, but occasionally the ultimate horse choice is determined by the details or a horse crush.

Making a Video That Sells Put on your movie director’s hat and go to work creating a high-quality video.

Choose two or three of the top candidates.

Montages with music and everything else are fantastic, but make them short and sweet, or people will swipe through and miss the nice stuff altogether. When it comes to jumping horses, I like to create four different clips:

  1. The project horse was acquired with the intention of reselling it, and I expect to earn a tidy profit from it. “Unfortunately, my horse is becoming older, and I need to sell him before his value begins to plummet. After crying so many times over this horse, I’ve given up.” He needs a new home, and it’s time to locate one.” Whatever your background, and whether you consider yourself to be an expert in horse sales or are completely clueless about where to begin, it is well acknowledged that selling horses is a difficult process to do. Even within the same nation, every vendor conducts the procedure in a unique way, and horse marketplaces are significantly diverse from one another. A book titled Horse Selling for Dummies should definitely be published. This industry is often considered to be one of the most unorganized and undisciplined of all time. We are selling live animals directly between vendors and owners, many of whom have no prior professional expertise and are participating in transactions with little to no prior knowledge. When it comes to horse trading, it’s easy to imagine it as a scene from an old western movie, complete with thrills and feats that would rival the finest cowboy action movie. Despite the fact that selling experiences seldom go according to plan, the film’s surprising story twist will wow its viewers just when they believe they have seen it all. It is imperative that horse owners, brokers, trainers, and breeders understand how to sell their horses profitably in this maelstrom of a horse market. The dollar sign will be our first point of reference. This Is a Good Deal A horse’s valuation will always be considered an art form, if not an abstract one. The worth of a horse is determined by the amount of money that a client is prepared to spend to acquire the horse. The question is, where do I begin my search for a client who is willing to write a large check to compensate me for the value of my prized horse? Starting with a trusted friend to help you through the procedure, it is possible that you may find yourself in a difficult situation. Yes, that will almost certainly result in a reduction in your commission rate. The idea that trust is a major element in this choice may be frightening to those who are concerned about making a profit. In spite of this, seeking assistance is not a bad idea. My preference is to maintain the pricing of horses within a price range and only disclose an exact dollar number to a genuine customer who is dedicated to checking the horse out before purchasing him. Whenever people hear rumors about a horse’s price fluctuating or declining, they are naturally skeptical. We all know that the price of a horse may alter dramatically depending on how quickly an owner wants his money returned. This will place them in a precarious position for no apparent reason. Consider doing your research and finding comparable horses if you have no clue what price to put on your horse. Although not an exact science, it all boils down to determining what quantity would leave you satisfied at the end of the day. People will, of course, bargain! Remember that. So it’s not a big deal if you round up the final figure a few hundred or thousand dollars so that you may offer the buyer more negotiating leverage. Involvement of Politics At the beginning of my riding career, I was that inexperienced rider attempting to sell my own horses in a market that was far larger than I could possibly compete with. Political involvement in the horse world, I discovered, is still very much a part of the scene. Next, I brought my junior hunter horse to the Wellington winter circuit, which is the epicenter of horse sales in North America and maybe even internationally, to sell a couple of years later. I didn’t take any trainers that year since I wanted to save money, and I also wanted to sell my horse on my own to maximize my earnings. When I originally entered the amateur owners category, I won a handful of classes and finished as a reserve champion in my first week of competing. Right? It should be simple to offer a high-quality, amateur-friendly hunter horse that is not excessively costly. But it isn’t the case at all! A former client of mine came up to me and told me that a judge had phoned her and said he would have tried the horse if it had been in her stable. I was pleasantly surprised. Politics of horses. Despite the fact that it is a terrible truth, it remains so. Instead of complaining, devise a strategy that best matches your needs while taking into account all of the aspects that influence this specialized sector. Just What Is It That I’m Promoting? Know your horse, keep track of his or her performance at shows, and understand where your horse belongs in the world (and in whose hands). A brilliant résumé befitting a future president may be crafted by anybody, but does your child’s 1.10m jumper, who is ten years old, have what it takes to compete at the Grand Prix level? In all likelihood, this is false. Whether it’s due to over-romanticized expectations, concealed faults, or other equine malfunctions, individuals will encounter them at some point. It’s preferable to inform them of the facts before wasting their time with a horse they will almost certainly not purchase. Consider the following: 8 Things to Consider Before Horse Shopping in Europe Radar Vision (X-Ray Vision) is defined as the ability to see through a transparent object at a distance of up to a few hundred meters. It may also be beneficial to have a new set of x-rays taken. When the agreement is finalized, it will eliminate any unpleasant surprises. Aside from that, it serves as a demonstration of good faith to the buyer, and it will assist you in setting a price for the horse as a result of the radiological examination results. It’s time to bring it to light! Aesthetics are important, whether you like it or don’t. If a horse is braided and newly trimmed, it will make a favorable first impression on a customer. Buyers who are familiar with horses will often test a couple of horses, although the ultimate horse selection may be determined by the details or a horse crush in some instances. Make your horse the most beautiful unicorn on the planet by not scrimping on the details. Sales-Pulling Video Invest some time in developing a high-quality video and put on your director’s hat. Having excellent concert videos is a plus. Choose two or three of the most promising candidates. However, recording home movies might be beneficial since it allows you to get a closer look at the horse. Montages with music and everything else are fantastic, but make them short and sweet, or people will swipe through and miss the nice stuff entirely. I prefer to produce four distinct video for jumping horses:

“I purchased a project horse with the intention of reselling it, and I expect to earn a tidy profit from it.” “Unfortunately, my horse is becoming older, and I need to sell him before his value plummets.” The thought of riding this horse again has made me cry too many times. “It’s past time to locate him a new residence.” Whatever your tale, and regardless of whether you consider yourself an expert in horse selling or have no clue where to begin, it is widely acknowledged that selling horses is a difficult endeavor.

  • A book titled Horse Selling for Dummies should, without a doubt, exist!
  • We are selling live animals directly between vendors and owners, many of whom have no prior professional expertise and are taking part in transactions for the first time.
  • Selling experiences seldom go as planned, and just when you think you’ve seen it all, the film’s surprising narrative twist will take you completely by surprise.
  • Let’s begin with the dollar sign.
  • The worth of a horse is determined by the amount of money that a client is prepared to spend to get it.
  • First and foremost, it could be a good idea to get the assistance of a reliable buddy who can help you through the procedure.
  • This alternative may be frightening to those who are concerned about making a profit, as trust is a major role in this selection.
See also:  What Is Horse Hoof Made Of? (Solution)

Personally, I prefer to keep the pricing of horses within a price range and only disclose an exact dollar figure to a genuine buyer who is dedicated to trying the horse.

It will put them in danger for no apparent reason, because, as we all know, the value of a horse may fluctuate dramatically depending on how quickly an owner wants his money back.

Although it isn’t an exact science, it all boils down to determining what much will make you pleased in the end.

So it’s not a big deal if you round up the final figure a few hundred or thousand dollars so that you may offer the buyer more negotiating leverage.

What I discovered was that politics continues to play an important role in the horse community.

I chose not to use any trainers that year in order to save money, and I intended to sell my horse on my own.

It should be simple to offer a high-quality and amateur-friendly hunter horse that isn’t costly, shouldn’t it?

A former client of mine came up to me and told me that a judge had phoned her and said he would have tried the horse if it had been in her stable.

It’s a terrible reality, but it’s nevertheless a fact of life.

What Is It That I’m Selling?

Anyone may put up a spectacular résumé fit for a future president, but does your child’s 1.10m jumper, who is ten years old, have what it takes to compete at the Grand Prix?

Over-romanticized expectations, hidden faults, and other horse malfunctions will arise at some point, therefore it’s best to provide all of the facts up front rather than wasting people’s time by forcing them to waste their time on a horse they will almost certainly not purchase in the end.

Also, it could be a good idea to get a new set of x-rays taken.

Additionally, it serves as a demonstration of good faith to the buyer, and it will assist you in determining a price for the horse as a result of the radiological examination.

Whether you like it or not, appearances are important.

Normal purchasers may test a few horses, but the ultimate horse selection may be determined by the specifics or by a horse crush.

Making a video that sells Put your movie-directing hat on and go to work creating a high-quality video.

Choose two or three of the finest to work with.

Montages with music and everything else are fantastic, but make them short and sweet, or people will scroll through and miss the good stuff. When it comes to jumping horses, I like to produce four different clips:

Written byAnne-Sophie Milette

“I purchased a project horse with the intention of reselling it, and I anticipate making a tidy profit from it.” “Unfortunately, my horse is growing older, and I need to sell him before his value plummets.” “This horse has made me cry so many times that I’ve given up. It’s past time to find him a new home.” Whatever your tale, and regardless of whether you consider yourself an expert in horse selling or have no clue where to begin, it is widely acknowledged that selling horses is a difficult undertaking.

  1. Clearly, there should be a Horse Selling for Dummies book available.
  2. We are exchanging live animals directly between vendors and owners, many of whom have little or no prior professional training.
  3. Selling experiences seldom go according to plan, and just when you think you’ve seen it all, the film’s surprising narrative twist will take you completely by surprise.
  4. The Price Is Right Pricing a horse is still considered an art form, albeit an abstract one for some.
  5. So, where do I begin my search for a client who will be willing to write a large check for my prized steed?
  6. Yes, that will almost certainly result in a commission loss.
  7. That being said, it does not rule out the possibility of seeking assistance.

When people hear through the grapevine that the price of a horse has changed or dropped, they get skeptical.

If you have no clue how much to ask for your horse, do your research and look for comparable horses for sale.

People are willing to bargain, don’t overlook that!

The Political Factor In my early days, I was that inexperienced rider attempting to sell my own horses in a market that was far larger than mine.

Then, a few of years ago, I took my junior hunter horse to sell during the Wellington winter circuit, which is considered to be the center of horse selling in North America and maybe the globe.

The first week I competed in the amateur owners category, I took first place in a couple of classes and finished as the reserve champion.

But that isn’t the case.

Horse-politics.

Instead of moaning about it, devise a strategy that best suits your needs while taking into account all of the factors that influence this niche economy.

Know your horse, keep track of his or her show results, and know where your horse belongs (and in whose hands).

Probably not.

Related: 8 Things to Consider Before Buying a Horse in Europe X-Ray vision is a type of vision that uses X-rays to see things.

It will eliminate any unpleasant surprises if and when the transaction is completed.

It’s Time to Make It Shine!

A well-braided and freshly clipped horse will make a good first impression on a potential buyer.

Don’t cut corners here – make your horse the most beautiful unicorn on the planet!

If you have high-quality show videos, that is fantastic!

It wouldn’t hurt to record home videos because it allows you to get a closer look at the horse. Montages with music and everything are great, but keep them short and sweet, or people will scroll through and miss the good parts. When it comes to jumping horses, I like to make four different clips:

Tips for buying or selling a horse

Individuals sell their horses for a variety of reasons. Some individuals choose to sell their horses because their horse is no longer suitable to perform the task they require of him. Others choose to sell their horses because their horse is no longer suitable to perform the task they require of him. Change in circumstances may compel many people to sell their horses, and making the decision to sell their horse has been a tough one for many. Whatever the motivation for selling a horse, it is critical to consider the horse’s long-term wellbeing while making a decision.

There are some unscrupulous individuals who may wish to sell your horse for a bigger financial benefit by employing various schemes, such as:

  • Sales of horses that have been the subject of a Loss of Use (LOU) insurance claim for a purpose that they may not be capable of and/or insurable
  • Dealers acting as “rescue” organizations or private vendors are a particular concern. Medicating horses in order to disguise undesirable characteristics or issues and then selling them

Horses who find up in the hands of fraudsters are in grave danger, as scammers have little or no concern for the wellbeing of the horses in their care. The more time and attention you put into ensuring that the person who buys your horse puts your horse’s best interests at the forefront of their choice, the more likely it is that your horse will have a long and prosperous future. Genuine purchasers should be willing to fulfill any number of reasonable requirements that are made of them by the seller.

1. Is selling the best option for your horse’s long term welfare?

  • By selling your horse, you are waiving any rights or legal interests you may have in his wellbeing. In the event that you are afraid that his well-being may be jeopardized, loaning him out or perhaps death may be a more humane solution. While compassionate euthanasia is a tough decision to make, it may be in your horse’s best interests to do so in order to save him from having to endure an uncertain future
  • Nonetheless, If your mare is no longer physically capable of ridden labor or if she has poor conformation, you should not sell her as a brood mare since she will not produce foals. It is possible to be just as physically demanding as rode work when carrying, delivering, and nursing a foal. For more information on horse breeding, go here. Even if your horse has been wounded, there is no assurance that the new owner will accept your request that he be used exclusively as a friend. The benefit of a long-term loan is that you can keep an eye on the health of your horse. Contact the World Horse Welfare Advice Line at +44 (0)1953 497 238 if you would like to speak with an unbiased horse welfare specialist about your alternatives.

2. Put your horse’s welfare first

  • In order to determine the fitness of a prospective buyer, find out over the phone exactly what the buyer wants to use the horse for, what expertise they have, and what type of facilities they have. The right to terminate a meeting with a prospective buyer is yours if you believe the buyer is not properly handling your horse, poses a threat to themselves or the horse, or employs practices that you do not approve of. If the ride time is becoming excessively long, inform the customer that you suspect that the ride duration has been exceeded. Additionally, if you consider the rider has not had sufficient time to become acquainted with your horse before making the choice to purchase, you should recommend this to them.

3. Be honest

  • When selling your horse, it is critical that you are forthright about the reasons for your decision to sell him, as well as his age, ability, and potential. Don’t prepare your tack-up ahead of time. In addition, tying him up in front of a prospective buyer will indicate that he is easy to handle and that he does not have any visible underlying health concerns, such as back discomfort. Prepare to go for a ride. This not only gets him warmed up, but it also provides the buyer with the opportunity to observe him perform at his peak while riding with a familiar rider on board. If necessary, obtain recommendations from judges or other respected persons regarding his performance and behavior at equestrian competitions. Due to consumer protection regulations, horses may be returned to their owners, who are entitled to a full refund, as well as reimbursement for any expenditures paid. The financial ramifications of being dishonest might be severe and costly.

4. Identity is essential

  • Make sure you have all of his papers on hand. The fact that you have been truthful about his age and that you are legally authorized to sell him will reassure any prospective buyer of your integrity. Never sell something without seeing it first. It is extremely bad to sell a horse to someone you have never met before since it implies that the buyer has not done adequate research and preparation. Unscrupulous individuals make money by purchasing inexpensive or free horses and hiding their flaws in order to resell them for a profit or to send them to slaughter for human consumption. Also be on the lookout for fraudulent financial transfers and banking frauds that may expose your personal information.

5. Carry out thorough checks

  • Look for the possible buyer on the internet. Social media networks may be a useful source of information, and they may be able to assist you in determining whether or not their intentions for your horse are legitimate. Speak with the veterinarian who will be performing the vet check. Inquire as to what the horse’s intended usage will be, as well as how much expertise the buyer have. If you have any reservations about a prospective buyer, simply walk away.

Scammers are continuously on the lookout for new, shady techniques of forging documents and taking advantage of people’s like for horses. As a result, while this advice is current at the time of publication, we will examine it on a regular basis in an effort to assist you in making informed decisions in the future.

Buying a horse

Many different roles may be played by horses in a person’s life, including aiding them to achieve their sports goals and serving as a faithful friend to their rider. The importance of finding a horse capable of doing the task at hand cannot be overstated, yet it is not unusual for individuals to be lured solely by the appearance of specific breeds, which can result in an unsatisfactory partnership. There are also many unscrupulous individuals who would attempt to take advantage of your enthusiasm for horses by employing various scams, such as:

  • Horses that have been loaned out and are being sold without the owner’s permission
  • Buying and selling a horse that has already been ruled incapable of performing a certain task, and who has been compensated by an insurance and classified as a Loss Of Use (LOU). The Petplan website has further information regarding Loss of Use
  • You may find it here. Horses “saved” from slaughter with severe crippling ailments who are frequently made to undergo long treks with no consideration for their well-being. Dealers acting as “rescue” organizations or private vendors are a particular concern. Horses with more than one microchip
  • Horses with many microchips Passports that have been altered, falsified, or duplicated
  • Horse passports, even those of deceased horses, that are being re-used in order to sell another horse
  • Horses that have been treated in order to disguise undesirable characteristics or issues

In order to extract money from individuals, scammers frequently employ very sophisticated strategies, with little or no consideration for the health of the horse in question. The greater the amount of time and effort you put into determining the identification and skills of a horse you intend to purchase, the less exposed you will be to fraudsters. Authentic merchants should be willing to fulfill any number of legitimate requests made by their buyers.

1. Know what you want

  • Be realistic in your expectations. You should take into consideration your riding or handling talents, as well as the amount of time and money you have to spend caring for and investing in your horse. Make certain that the horse is appropriate for the task at hand. Hire a professional horse veterinarian who has been suggested to you by someone who is trustworthy and competent
  • Bring along a horse person who is well-versed in the horse world. It is impossible to regret having a second set of eyes and an unbiased view, even if you have a great deal of previous experience. Most importantly, always evaluate the financial and long-term implications of your decision.

2. Carry out thorough checks

  • Check to see if the seller has a good reputation, and don’t rely just on remarks posted on their own website or social media platforms. Information on the horse and the vendor should be shared on well-established and reliable forums. To determine whether the vendor, the premises, and the horse have been advertised elsewhere and in what context, perform a Google search for the information. Take a look at the horse’s background. Current owners are obligated by law to register their ownership within 28 days of taking possession, so if they haven’t done so and there isn’t a logical explanation for why they haven’t, go away. Consult with the vendor for the contact information of the horse’s former owner and contact them to confirm the horse’s age, health history, and ability at the time of sale. Is this a good deal? Consider why you’re doing it. An untrained horse does not emerge from training for no reason, and sellers do not often sell a horse at a low price to a total stranger without a compelling purpose. When purchasing a horse in the United Kingdom or from another country, there are several considerations to keep in mind:
  • Biosecurity – be meticulous in your quarantine procedures and make certain that there is solid documentation that they have been correctly maintained
  • Transport – prior to the horse leaving its destination, ensure that you have a detailed journey plan that includes the horse’s fitness to travel, the distance he will travel, how he will make this journey, that appropriate rest stops have been arranged with proper biosecurity procedures, and that the transport company has a good track record of transporting horses responsibly and placing welfare first
  • In terms of documentation, various countries have different legal needs, so make sure you are informed of the current laws in both the nation you are buying from and the country you will be importing the horse to
See also:  How Long Can A Horse Canter? (Perfect answer)

3. Identity is essential

  • Never make a purchase without seeing it first. Many unethical dealers purposefully utilize internet marketplaces to falsify information in order to get an advantage over their competitors. Pictures and video may be deceiving, and the horse seen in the film or photograph may not even be the same horse that you are considering purchasing. Anyone selling a horse will present him in the best possible light, but some unscrupulous individuals may attempt to conceal flaws. Visit the yard on multiple occasions during the day at various times of the day. Horses are complicated creatures with a plethora of factors that are impossible to account for even with the most precise description, video, or photography
  • They are also difficult to predict. Instruct your veterinarian to examine his microchip and, more critically, to ensure that there is only one microchip. The microchipping of all horses born after the 1st of July 2009 is a legal obligation, however many horses born prior to this date are also microchipped for identification purposes. The information on the microchip must correspond to the information on the passport. When you enter his microchip number onto websites such as, you may verify some data (such as his country of origin). A legitimate vendor should be willing to reveal the microchip number with you
  • However, this is not always the case. Take a look at his passport. An honest vendor will always have an up-to-date passport on hand when selling any horse, even if they are acting on someone else’s behalf in the transaction. Verify that the silhouette, age, microchip number, branding or freeze marking, as well as the presence of a Loss of Use mark (LOU markings can be extremely problematic when it comes to obtaining insurance for horses), are correct on the passport, and that all of the owner’s information is correct on the passport. If you have any questions, you should contact the Passport Issuing Organization. The only stamps that are allowed to legally appear on a passport are those of the original Passport Issuing Organization, the Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, and a veterinary stamp. Any more stamps should trigger major concerns
  • Otherwise, they should be avoided.

4. Know your rights

  • Make no financial commitments – including holding deposits, expenses for livery or transportation – until you have completed all of the necessary extensive checks and are confident in your selection. Make certain that all of the costs have been agreed upon in writing before you part with any money, and that they are fair and reasonable in nature. Credit arrangements are fraught with uncertainty. If you fail to make a payment on time, many agreements enable the seller to take possession of the horse immediately, regardless of how many payments you have paid thus far. You should also keep in mind that you will still be responsible for making payments if the horse passes away. Return agreements should be avoided at all costs. While a buyer has the right to return a horse under the Sale of Goods Act 1979 and the Consumer Contracts Regulation 2014, obtaining a full refund can be time-consuming and expensive, often costing more than the horse’s worth. Obtain a formal confirmation of your purchase. When you purchase a horse, always ask for a dated receipt that includes the vendor’s name and address, the horse’s intended use, his passport and microchip numbers, as well as the total money you paid. In order to safeguard customers, the Consumer Contracts Regulation 2014 applies to any goods (including a horse) that is purchased away from the trader’s premises (for example, online or over the phone). More information may be found at:

5. Seek advice

  • Consider seeking and following the advise of a qualified, impartial equine veterinarian before making the decision to purchase a horse
  • World Horse Welfare’s Advice Line may be reached at +44 (0)1953 497 238 during office hours for free, practical help before, during, and after purchasing a horse. To report a suspected dishonest merchant, you should contact the Consumer Protection Division of Trading Standards.

Scammers are continuously on the lookout for new, shady techniques of forging documents and taking advantage of people’s like for horses.

As a result, while this advice is current at the time of publication, we will examine it on a regular basis in an effort to assist you in making informed decisions in the future.

Why buy when you can rehome?

We hope that you would consider rehoming rather than purchasing and that you will consider giving a horse in need a second shot in life. All of our horses have undergone a thorough examination by the veterinarian and farrier, and they are provided with a passport, microchip, and the truth about their temperament and skills. Pay a visit to our website’s “Housing” section now to see the broad selection of horses and ponies that are searching for new homes. In addition, the World Horse Welfare Association is a member of the Pet Advertising Advisory Group.

The Dos and Don’ts of Buying and Selling Horses

Year after year, hundreds of thousands of horses are purchased, sold, adopted, and rehomed. Finding a new equine companion may be either an amazing and enjoyable experience, or a difficult and draining one, depending on how you approach it. Flickr photo by marco antonio torres (CC BY-SA 2.0 license). Horse sellers have a bad reputation due to cultural stigma, but if you ask anyone who has sold a horse, they will tell you that every horse buyer has their own set of eccentricities that they need to be aware of.

It is possible (and desirable) to avoid all of these pitfalls since we are all striving to achieve the same goal: a nice home for the horse, an exciting future for the rider, and a speedy and flawless transaction for the seller.

Advice for Horse Buyers

Make an effort to be truthful with the vendor, your trainer, and even yourself. Don’t inform the vendor that your budget is three times greater than your maximum allowable amount. If you’re still learning two-point eventing, don’t tell your trainer that your objective is to compete at the Advanced level. If you know that you will only be able to come to the barn once a week, don’t persuade yourself that you want to retrain a green horse. Throughout the years, I’ve seen many individuals overestimate their abilities and come try a horse that I would never have matched them with if honesty had been at the forefront of the dialogue.

Don’t: Make Assumptions.

Don’t make the mistake of assuming that because you are looking for an off-the-track Thoroughbred that it will be very sensitive. If you receive a draft cross, don’t assume that it is in good condition since it was drafted. Don’t make the mistake of assuming that just because you’re buying from an Olympian, the horse will be schooled. We are all familiar with the cardinal rule of making assumptions.

Do: Your Homework.

Look up the seller’s name on the internet and read the reviews. You can find out a lot about a company these days, whether it’s by simply glancing at their Facebook page or going as far as checking with the Better Business Bureau. A dishonest vendor will leave a trail, and you may follow it to its conclusion.

Don’t: Be Obnoxious.

While knowledge is power, it is possible to collect a great deal of information without pestering the vendor. Pay close attention to the specifics of the advertisement. You should not call to inquire about whether or not the horse is a good match for your youngster who is moving up from a pony if the description states that the horse is green broke.

If it states that the horse was born in 2014, do not inquire as to the horse’s age. In addition, if it states that the horse is priced “in the mid five figures” (which translates to $40-$60 thousand dollars) and your budget is $5,000, do not inquire further.

Do: Be Timely.

As soon as you notice a horse that appears too good to be true, book that plane ticket immediately since other purchasers are likely to believe the same thing. Highly publicized, athletic horses typically sell fast, and you will need to contact the seller as soon as possible to organize a trial ride and travel to the location where the horse is being sold. In the meanwhile, if you honestly feel the horse will be a good match for you, start looking into local vets and putting your financial affairs in order first.

Don’t: Drag Your Feet.

Once you have experienced the horse and fallen in love with him, you must notify the vendor as soon as possible of your interest. Schedule the veterinarian pre-purchase exam as soon as possible, examine the exam results as soon as possible, and make your selection as soon as possible. You do not have ownership of the horse until your name is on the contract and money has been exchanged. In many cases, purchases fall through for no apparent reason, and as a result, sellers are free (and encouraged) to continue displaying the horse to other potential purchasers until the paperwork is finished.

However, vendors such as myself are required by law to watch out for both our own and the horse’s best interests.

Do: A pre-purchase examination (PPE)

If at all possible, the pre-purchase examination should be carried out by a veterinarian that you or your own personal veterinarian has confidence in. Acquire as much information as you can afford and utilize that knowledge to assist you in making your purchase decision.

Don’t: Pass/Fail a Horse.

A personal protective equipment (PPE) is an excellent tool for establishing a baseline and detecting major injuries. What it is not capable of doing is predicting the future. Make certain that the veterinarian doing the PPE is reputable, but also that you are aware of and understand the entire process before proceeding. PPEs are not graded on a scale from A to F, and there are many other grades in between.

Advice for Horse Sellers

Honesty is the best policy, just as it is with the consumer. Integrity in the horse’s sanity, ability, soundness, and wants is essential. I’ve discovered that although harsh honesty may frighten away tire-kickers, it does not scare away those who are a perfect fit for your company. Even though dishonesty is nearly always uncovered during a trial ride, PPE, or during the first few weeks, honesty may go a long way in a world when all you have to show for yourself are your horses and your reputation, it is important to maintain your integrity.

Don’t: Do Anything You’re Not Comfortable With.

When it comes to horse sales, I believe that my gut feeling is my most valuable instrument. If you believe the rider should not leap during the trial ride, express your concerns. If you are not comfortable with the prospect of participating in a trial, do not proceed. Despite the fact that the buyer is providing you the full amount, you should not sell your horse if you aren’t completely satisfied with the match.

A significant level of liability exists in this profession, and protecting oneself is essential. In the event that your gut tells you that something is incorrect, trust your instinct.

Do: Advertise Well.

A lot of the time, I encounter sellers of lovely horses who are perplexed as to why they aren’t getting any interest, and I can always refer them to their advertisement. I’ve discovered that the horse only accounts for 75% of the equation, with the remaining 25% accounted for by the advertisement. Engage the services of a professional photographer to get good photographs of the horse’s conformation and movement. It also helps to demonstrate that the horse is capable of doing the task described in the advertisement.

Generally speaking, movies should be no more than two minutes in length and should contain all three gaits, unless otherwise specified.

Take advantage of all available resources, including images and video, to present the horse in the best possible light.

Don’t: Overprice.

A horse that is overvalued does nothing except restrict earnings potential. In business, time is money, and board is costly. While hearing that you might have obtained extra thousand or two dollars is discouraging, the aim is to sell as fast as possible to a suitable house. Assess the horse realistically, set a reasonable price for it, and make adjustments as needed.

Do: Have A Strong Contract.

Aside from your word, the contract is the only thing you have. Recognize that you did not attend law school and seek professional legal guidance as soon as possible. Learn about the equestrian laws in your state and how to apply them to your advantage. Lastly, if in doubt, seek the advice of other competent horse sellers for guidance. Contracts are changed with each transaction, and with each adjustment, the contract becomes more powerful overall. Make good use of the solid contract. (For further information from a veterinarian, see ” Top 6 Mistakes “.)

Don’t: Accept Checks.

Apart from your word, the contract is the only thing you have. Understand that you did not attend law school and seek legal counsel. Recognize and take advantage of your state’s equestrian regulations. Moreover, if in doubt, seek the advice of other competent horse vendors for guidance. As sales contracts are changed with each transaction, the contract becomes stronger as a result of the modifications. Use that powerful contract to your advantage. If you need further advise from a veterinarian, see ” Top 6 Mistakes “.

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