How To Kill A Horse?

The recommended ways to kill a horse are by firearm or lethal injection. If you choose to use a firearm, the preferred method is by a rifle shot using the frontal method. The ideal site is slightly above (1cm) the intersection of two imaginary lines drawn from the eye to the opposite ear.

What is the most humane way to put down a horse?

The most common way to euthanize a horse is a lethal injection. You’ll need to move the horse, if possible without causing it undue pain, to a place where it will be easy to remove the body. The veterinarian will inject a sedative, followed by a large dose of barbiturates.

Will a 9mm put down a horse?

22-caliber long rifle is usually sufficient to euthanize a horse, but a 9mm or. 38-caliber or larger handgun will be more reliable, as will large caliber rifles. The use of hollow-point or soft nose bullets will increase brain destruction and reduce the chance of ricochet.

Why do they kill horses?

Horse slaughter is the practice of slaughtering horses to produce meat for consumption. Equine domestication is believed to have begun to raise horses for human consumption.

Can you shoot your own horse?

At least in the United States, you are legally permitted to kill a horse so long as you have the permission of the owner and do so in a humane way. Additional charges may arise if you do certain things with the carcass.

What drug is used to put a horse down?

Lethal injection with a barbiturate, typically pentobarbital, is the method most commonly employed by veterinarians in the United States. The barbiturates used are DEA controlled substances so this method can only be carried out by a licensed veterinarian.

Where is the best place to shoot a horse?

The recommended ways to kill a horse are by firearm or lethal injection. If you choose to use a firearm, the preferred method is by a rifle shot using the frontal method. The ideal site is slightly above (1cm) the intersection of two imaginary lines drawn from the eye to the opposite ear.

What is shoeing a horse?

A farrier’s job involves making and fitting horseshoes, checking the horse’s overall leg, foot and hoof health, and trimming and shaping the excess hoof growth. When shoeing a horse, they’ll need to use their judgement to make sure the shoes are an exact fit, to ensure that the horse is properly balanced.

How much is a dead horse worth?

In general, the average horse sells for about $400-$500. Horse slaughter is the practice of slaughtering horses to produce meat for consumption.

How much is it to euthanize a horse?

The costs are variable depending on the situation. The basic necropsy costs $80 but if additional tests need to be done the cost can increase. Generally currently they are running about $130 for a full necropsy. A basic necropsy can be done on farm by one of our doctors prior to burial.

Is equine euthanasia painful?

Will it be painless? Equine euthanasia is most often accomplished by injection of a death- inducing drug. Your veterinarian may administer a tranquilizer first to relax your horse. When the horse is euthanized, death will be quick and painless.

How do vets euthanize horses?

The horse is given an intravenous (jugular vein in the neck) injection of an anesthetic or similar drug or combination of drugs that result in its death. The horse becomes anesthetized (and therefore unconscious) to such a degree that its heart stops beating and death follows.

Is it illegal to eat horse?

It’s taboo to eat horse in America. The three U.S. slaughterhouses that dealt in horse closed in 2007, according to the New Food Economy. Horses in the United States can be sold and shipped to other countries, where it is legal to slaughter them for food.

What is horse abuse?

Horse abuse is the cause of suffering or harm upon a horse for any reason other than self-defense. There are federal and state laws that address animal abuse and cruelty. Ignorance is the most common cause of horse abuse.

What is a kill pen for horses?

The transit system includes kill pens, which hold masses of horses in cramped, unhealthy and under-kept conditions until they can be auctioned for slaughter. The horse’s last moments are filled with terror and pain and abandonment.

The facts about horse slaughter

Those who advocate horse killing have put forward several arguments to defend their perspective on the subject of horse slaughter. However, if you examine the facts, you will discover that horse slaughter for meat is not only needless and cruel, but it is also damaging in a variety of ways. The following are responses to some of the most often asked questions concerning horse slaughter. As soon as you realize how horrible horse slaughter is, you will understand why we must work to halt horse slaughter in the United States and the export of horses for slaughter overseas.

Is it possible to conduct commercial horse slaughter in a humane manner?

No. Because of the nature of the industry and the particular biology of horses, horse slaughter has never been and will never be compassionate, whether in the United States or in foreign countries. Death by slaughter is a terrible and scary conclusion for horses, and it is not a compassionate way to put them to rest. Horses are transported in cramped vehicles for more than 24 hours at a time without access to food, water, or rest. In many cases, they are gravely hurt or murdered while in transportation.

As a result, horses are frequently subjected to multiple blows and may even stay awake throughout dismemberment; as a result, they seldom die quickly and painlessly.

The solution is not to revert to exposing our horses to torture and inhumane circumstances in slaughterhouses in the United States, but rather to outlaw horse slaughter and the export of horses for slaughter entirely, and to provide our horses with dignified lives and, when necessary, merciful deaths.

Will horse slaughter have a negative financial impact on American taxpayers?

Yes. Supporting horse slaughter brutality would take valuable financial resources away from American products and food safety, which will be detrimental to the economy. It makes no sense for the federal government to spend millions of dollars in taxpayer funds to supervise the construction of additional horse slaughterhouses. An extension of funding for a new program to slaughter horses should not be approved by the USDA at a time when Congress is focused on fiscal responsibility and the Food Safety Inspection Service’s budget is already stretched thin.

Is horsemeat safe for human consumption?

No. Horsemeat produced in the United States is hazardous to human health due to the uncontrolled administration of various harmful chemicals to horses before to slaughter. Horses are grown and handled as companion animals in the United States, rather than as food-producing animals. In contrast to animals raised for human consumption, the vast majority of horses sent to slaughter will have ingested, or been treated with, or injected with, a variety of chemical substances that are known to be harmful to humans, have not been tested on humans, or have been specifically prohibited from being used in animals raised for human consumption before slaughter.

As a result of worries about the potential health risks associated with drug-laced horsemeat, the European Union (EU), a major importer of North American horsemeat, has stopped horsemeat imports from Mexico, where 87 percent of horses killed for sale to the EU are of United States origin.

The decision was taken after a series of damning audits revealed a slew of issues, including the lack of traceability of American horses and horrendous suffering on American soil and in Mexico, among other things.

Can the federal government ensure the safety of horsemeat?

No. The USDA does not have a system in place to track horses’ medical histories throughout the course of their lives, and the image of the whole United States meat business is at danger. Testing random samples of horsemeat ignores the reality that each and every horse has a distinct and unknown past, which must be considered. Horses, in contrast to animals reared for food, do not spend their whole lives being prepared for the food chain. Every horse is a friend, a pet, a riding buddy, a race horse, a show pony, or a working companion.

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The use of random-sample testing for horsemeat is insufficient and perhaps harmful.

Has ending domestic horse slaughter damaged the U.S. horse market and led to neglect and abandonment?

No. Equine neglect and abandonment cannot be related to the closing of slaughterhouses in the United States on a rational basis. Even after our domestic slaughter factories closed in 2007, horses are still being shipped to slaughterhouses in Canada and Mexico, and the number of American horses destined to slaughter has not dropped since the plants closed in 2007. As is obvious, any rise in neglect or abandonment—as well that any fall in demand for horses—is linked to the economic crisis that began the same year as the final slaughter factory closed and has continued to this day.

Instead, the continuous availability of horse slaughter has only served to encourage and prolong overbreeding, negligence, and irresponsibility among horse owners and breeders.

Are there any other options for horses at risk of going to slaughter?

Yes. There are a variety of approaches that may be used to minimize the number of homeless or at-risk horses. In order to reduce overbreeding, we must educate owners about alternate rehoming choices and increase adoption efforts. Every year, thousands of American horses are taken to slaughter, and the great majority of them would be rehomed if they were not sent to slaughter. Not every horse headed to slaughter has to be rescued. According to the USDA, 92.3 percent of horses transported to slaughter are in good condition and are capable of living a productive life after being slaughtered.

The thought of murdering companion animals is incompatible with the values of the American people, and it will never be supported.

There are nations that consume dogs, cats, and other pets as food, but we do not allow our dogs and cats to be exported for food reasons, despite the fact that those animals are suffering from a well-documented overpopulation problem.

Will horse slaughter plants stimulate local economies?

No. Horse slaughter factories have proven to be a financial and environmental disaster for the towns that have been forced to accommodate them. These plants contaminate local water supplies, depress property prices, fill the air with a horrible odor, deplete local economies, and harm the environment in a variety of ways. The last three horse slaughter factories in the United States provided just a few low-wage, unsafe employment that did nothing to help the local economies recover from the Great Recession.

Example: The City Council of Kaufman, Texas, which is home to the Dallas Crown facility, overwhelmingly decided in 2005 to initiate termination procedures against the facility.

For municipalities that were plagued by the existence of a horse slaughter industry, attracting new business was difficult because of the bad connotation associated with it.

Brother Dege – How to Kill a Horse – Amazon.com Music

On August 16, 2021, a review will be conducted in the United States. Purchase that has been verified On January 11, 2017, a review was conducted in the United States. Purchase that has been verified On December 4, 2013, a review was conducted in the United States. Rootsy, Americana country/bluesdirges with a dark seam of rural folklore and theological allusion, this Lafayette, Louisiana underground icon’s tenth studio album is a must-have. Dege Legg sings with the type of true authenticity that crawls up your leg and into your soul, sending shivers down your spine and into your bones.

  1. He also lists Henry Miller and William Faulkner, Sonic Youth, Blind Willie Johnson, junkyards, quantum metaphysics, and rodeo clowns as his influences.
  2. Following your arrival, you’ll find yourself locked in the weird and grotesquely beautiful realm of BrotherDege’s head.
  3. Shades of Seasick Steve, Keb Mo, Murder By Death, Charlie Parr, JoshT.
  4. On December 27, 2015, a review was conducted in the United States.
  5. As you listen, you’ll see that the man has a varied musical taste that, even with sparse production, has auditory richness that grows on you with each listening session.

It’s one of the most touching CDs in my collection, and it was one of my favorite finds of 2015. Reviewed on January 20, 2016, in the United States of America

Top reviews from other countries

5.0 stars out of 5 for this product On December 19, 2018, a review was published in Germany. Purchase that has been verified 5.0 stars out of 5 for this product [email protected] On January 22, 2020, a review was conducted in Germany. Purchase that has been verified 5.0 stars out of 5 for this product genial! The article was published in France on January 29, 2014. Verified Purchase an artist who is not well-known to you to discover if you are not a fan of the usual suspects. You’d want to come up with an idea, wouldn’t you?

  1. Make the effort to look him up on YouTube to see what he’s capable of doing.
  2. 4.0 stars out of 5 for this product Top!
  3. Purchase that has been verified This is a fantastic album that is instantly recognizable from the first notes on.
  4. One little quibble: it’s a shame that the jaquette is packaged in cardboard since it’s very fragile, but else everything is fine.
  5. Purchase that has been verified This artist’s new album is atypical, habitual, and out of the ordinary.

Brother Dege – How to Kill a Horse – Amazon.com Music

On August 16, 2021, a review will be conducted in the United States. Purchase that has been verified On January 11, 2017, a review was conducted in the United States. Purchase that has been verified On December 4, 2013, a review was conducted in the United States. Rootsy, Americana country/bluesdirges with a dark seam of rural folklore and theological allusion, this Lafayette, Louisiana underground icon’s tenth studio album is a must-have. Dege Legg sings with the type of true authenticity that crawls up your leg and into your soul, sending shivers down your spine and into your bones.

  • He also lists Henry Miller and William Faulkner, Sonic Youth, Blind Willie Johnson, junkyards, quantum metaphysics, and rodeo clowns as his influences.
  • Following your arrival, you’ll find yourself locked in the weird and grotesquely beautiful realm of BrotherDege’s head.
  • Shades of Seasick Steve, Keb Mo, Murder By Death, Charlie Parr, JoshT.
  • On December 27, 2015, a review was conducted in the United States.
  • As you listen, you’ll see that the man has a varied musical taste that, even with sparse production, has auditory richness that grows on you with each listening session.

It’s one of the most touching CDs in my collection, and it was one of my favorite finds of 2015. Reviewed on January 20, 2016, in the United States of America

Top reviews from other countries

5.0 stars out of 5 for this product On December 19, 2018, a review was published in Germany. Purchase that has been verified 5.0 stars out of 5 for this product [email protected] On January 22, 2020, a review was conducted in Germany. Purchase that has been verified 5.0 stars out of 5 for this product genial! The article was published in France on January 29, 2014. Verified Purchase an artist who is not well-known to you to discover if you are not a fan of the usual suspects. You’d want to come up with an idea, wouldn’t you?

  1. Make the effort to look him up on YouTube to see what he’s capable of doing.
  2. 4.0 stars out of 5 for this product Top!
  3. Purchase that has been verified This is a fantastic album that is instantly recognizable from the first notes on.
  4. One little quibble: it’s a shame that the jaquette is packaged in cardboard since it’s very fragile, but else everything is fine.
  5. Purchase that has been verified This artist’s new album is atypical, habitual, and out of the ordinary.
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Where to strike a horse.

The horse may be killed by a hit to the head, a gunshot, or chloroform, as seen in Figure 2. 1. via blows.– As soon as the horse is blinded, the operator should take a position on each side and in front of the anumal, aiming his strike at a place midway along a line drawn across his forehead from above the eye to the dentere of the pit, as shown in this illustration. Take a look at Fig. 2. One powerful and well-directed hit will bring down the animal, but the blow should be repeated several times to ensure complete destruction.” When a horse’s head is drawn, it indicates where a humane stunning blow should be delivered.” data-image-caption=”A depiction of a horse’s head showing where a humane stunning blow should be delivered.” data-medium-file=”ssl=1″ data-medium-file=”ssl=1″ The data-large-file attribute is set to “ssl=1” in this example.

The horse may be killed by a hit to the head, a gunshot, or chloroform, as seen in Figure 2.

Take a look at Fig.

One powerful and well-directed hit will bring down the animal, but the blow should be repeated several times to ensure complete annihilation.

10 Plants and Chemicals That Are Toxic to Horses – The Horse

There are a variety of foods that horses should never consume. To be sure, poisonous plants are at the top of the list of things to stay away from, but there are other substances, creatures, and chemicals that can be harmful as well. Despite the fact that poisoning in horses is uncommon when compared to other types of illness, when it does occur, the results can be catastrophic. Veterinary clinical toxicologist Cynthia Gaskill, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ABVP, associate professor at the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and a member of the American Board of Veterinary Pathology, says that many people believe horses know what to eat and what not to eat.

It is possible for horses to eat poisonous chemicals in a variety of ways, from taking a curious nibble of a tree limb to accidentally consuming tainted grain meal. These toxic compounds can put their health and perhaps their lives at danger. Here are our top ten picks:

1. Yew

Yielding red berries in the fall, yews such as the American, English, Japanese, and Western varieties are decorative evergreen hedge-type plants. For the most part, they are widely employed in landscaping throughout North America. Horses are at risk. According to Sarah Ralston, VMD, PhD, professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at Rutgers University, as little as a mouthful or two of yew can be fatal, according to her research. Taxine, an alkaloid poison found in the plant, causes cardiac and respiratory collapse, frequently within minutes of exposure.

Possibility of exposure Yew poisoning occurs most frequently when trimming clippings are mistakenly dumped into pastures after pruning, with the leaves staying deadly even after they have wilted.

2. Oleander

During the spring and summer, this typical beautiful perennial evergreen shrub blooms flowers in shades of white, pink, and red. Oleander is a plant that is common in the southern United States, yet it only flourishes in places where temperatures remain above freezing. Horses are at risk. Potent cardiac glycosides found in the plant interfere with the heart’s ion balance, resulting in irregular heart activity that can eventually lead to cardiac failure and death if not treated promptly. Horses are regarded fatal in relatively little levels (0.005 percent of the horse’s total weight, or 0.05 pounds for a 1,000-pound horse).

Possibility of exposure Horses are frequently exposed to oleander when humans rake clippings into pastures and leave them there.

3. Ionophores

Animal feed additives containing antibiotics, such as monensin, are utilized as growth promoters in the diets of cattle and poultry. Farmers also employ them as antiprotozoal drugs to combat Coccidia infections, which they obtain through livestock. Horses are at risk. In comparison to other livestock, horses are more sensitive to ionophores, which alter ion transport across cell membranes and, as a result, influence the function of nerves and muscles. It is known that ionophores are cardiotoxic to horses, since they cause damage to the heart muscle, according to Karyn Bischoff (DVM, MS, Dipl.

Consumption symptoms might include a loss of appetite, high heart rate, sweating, colic, and abrupt death, among other things.

“Unfortunately, a large number of these animals do not survive.

As Gaskill points out, “exposure to cattle feed with the permitted dose of ionophore is an uncommon cause of poisoning in horses.” “The majority of the time, the problem occurs when horses are exposed to a concentrated pre-mix or an inadequately prepared cattle feed with a greater dose.”

4. Blister beetles

Blister beetles, which are abundant in the Midwestern United States, swarm alfalfa fields and can be baled into alfalfa hay during the harvest season. They are active from mid-summer to late summer, feeding on the tops of alfalfa plants. Horses are at risk. Blister beetles contain cantharidin, which is a poisonous toxin that also serves as a blister-causing agent. After eating it, “the horse may develop blisters in the mouth and esophagus, as well as ulcerations in the stomach and intestinal tract,” according to Bischoff.

  1. “It’s simply a fire that burns the entire time.” In most cases, clinical indications occur within hours of ingestion and include gastrointestinal distress, straining and frequent urine, as well as sores in and around the mouth.
  2. Possibility of exposure Throughout the crimping process, Alfalfa hay can become infected with beetles that are crushed during the procedure (when hay stems are broken to hasten drying).
  3. Because of the beetles’ proclivity to swarm, only a few flakes of hay in a bale may be harmed by their presence.
  4. He suggests purchasing hay from producers who take measures while harvesting.

5. Rodenticides and pesticides

These are items that are designed to kill rats and mice, gophers, birds, snails, slugs, ants, and other pests that have invaded your home. They are frequently comprised of a pelleted, granular, or powdered bait formulation. Horses are at risk. Horses can be killed by the poisonous compounds included in rodenticides and insecticides if they are exposed to high enough quantities. Typical anticoagulant rodenticides, such as rat poison, are meant to induce bleeding and hemorrhage in the targeted pest, but they have the potential to have similar effects in bigger animals.

Possibility of exposure In order to attract pests, many bait-type goods have sweet flavorings or grain bases that are meant to attract them.

Exposure often arises as a result of improper storage or because individuals responsible for laying the bait do not adhere to the label instructions.

6. Herbicides

Some landowners use pesticides to keep weeds under control on their properties. Herbicides such as glyphosate and phenoxy are the most often used. Horses are at risk. AFTER being sprayed with herbicide, horses may be more likely to consume toxic plants that they would not normally eat, according to Dr. Safdar Khan of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Animal Poison Control Center, who previously served as director of toxicology at the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center. “When herbicides are employed, they can cause specific chemical changes in the plant, which, for whatever reason, can make the plant more appealing to horses.” Diarrhea and colic are frequently observed following exposure.

As a result, it is critical to adhere to product requirements. “For grazing animals, there is often a withdrawal period included in the instructions (designating how long the animal should be kept off pasture following treatment),” he explains further.

7. Decaying organic matter

Rotting hay, haylage, and other organic materials may contain botulism-causing toxins generated by the bacteria Clostridium botulinum, which can cause death. Horses are at risk. Cattle and horses are particularly sensitive to C. botulinumtoxins, which damage the nerves that connect with muscles, causing widespread weakness that eventually develops to paralysis in the horses. Medical professionals have identified a number of clinical indications of botulism, including the inability to eat and drink, drooling, nasal discharge, muscular spasms, trouble getting up, difficulty breathing, and death.

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It has been discovered that certain sections of the country, such as Kentucky, have significant quantities of toxin-producing bacterial spores in the soil.

The poison can be found in animal corpses as well.

8. Fumonisin (moldy corn)

This mycotoxin (fungal toxin) has the potential to infect corn before harvest or while in storage. Increased fumonisin concentrations in growing corn are connected with hot, dry circumstances followed by high humidity, which are most prevalent in the Midwest and South, respectively. Horses are at risk. Moldy corn poisoning, also known as equine leukoencephalomalacia (ELEM), is a fast developing and sometimes deadly neurologic condition that affects horses that ingest maize that has dangerous fumonisin levels.

According to Bischoff, the outlook is not promising for those who do survive.

Possibility of exposure Fumonisin contamination is tested for in the majority of commercial feed mills.

9. Red maple

Researchers have known that wilted red maple leaves may be harmful to horses, but they also propose that other kinds, such as sugar and silver maple, can be troublesome as well. Horses are at risk. While study on the mechanism underlying red maple poisoning is ongoing, experts believe the poisonous chemical is connected to levels of gallic acid, which grow in leaves over the summer. The leaves in conjunction with some bacteria generate a powerful oxidant that destroys horses’ red blood cells, limiting their capacity to deliver oxygen or killing them altogether.

Clinical indicators include lack of appetite, crimson urine, increased drinking and urination, and an overall sad condition.

Possibility of exposure “Red maple poisoning hellip; happens mostly in the late summer and early fall,” says Bischoff.

Fallen branches in a paddock following a storm are the most common source of exposure, with wilted leaves remaining toxic for as long as 30 days. Bored or curious, a horse might strip the leaves off and eat them. Scientists believe the bark is also toxic.

10. Tansy ragwort

Tansy ragwort is a nondescript yellow blooming plant that may be found over most of North America. Horses are at risk. When a horse consumes enough of the plant in a short period of time, or lower amounts over a longer length of time, he or she might develop an incurable chronic liver disease, but the symptoms may not appear for six months to a year, according to Bischoff. Head-pressing, circling, and other strange behavior are all possible signs of neurologic illness. It is also typical to see a decrease in appetite and weight reduction over time.

Take-Home Message

Several chemicals are poisonous to horses, with ill effects ranging from moderate to lethal, depending on what was taken, how much, the horse’s size and condition, and other case circumstances, among other factors. Because horses are not always aware of what is damaging to them, owners and caregivers must be acutely aware of these dangers when caring for and managing their horses.

BROTHER DEGE – How to Kill a Horse

Www.brotherdege.com POSTED BY FRED MILLSO It happens every once in a blue moon, and I do mean once in a blue moon, that I receive a record in the mail that I have absolutely no idea what it is about. Yet, out of the dozens of records I receive on a daily basis, something about this lone arrival compels me to walk over to the stereo and cue it up right away. In the instance of How to Kill a Horse, this was the case. I wonder whether it had something to do with the somewhat Gothic/violent connotations of the title, along with the sleeve picture, which depicted an extreme close-up of a grey-hued horse in all her equestrian purity.

  • I’m at a loss for words.
  • That was followed by a second time, and then a third.
  • Brother Dege, also known as Dege Legg to family and friends, is originally from Southern Louisiana and, according to his profile on his website, is of Cajun-French, Irish, and Native American descent.
  • Since 1997, he has released multiple albums, including several with the band Santeria, whose 2008 albumYear of the Knife was a critical and commercial success.
  • Aha.
  • In the same vein as that album, which was primal but melodic, edgy hard rock coupled to deep-South blues and at times evocative of the late, great Sixteen Horsepower, Brother Dege draws on multiple decades of influential music while striving to create a totally unique style.
  • GreyMofro, Rocco DeLuca, and Rainer Ptacek, most notably because of Dege’s prominent use of the instrument, which has twinned atmospheric-yet-earthy qualities that represent mystery and spirits alongside elegance and conviction.
  • His protagonist’s longing for adventure is obvious on the album’s opening track, “The Black Sea,” a minor-chord, slide-guitar, midtempo thumper that evokes the sea.
  • I’ve got a horse to slaughter that no man will be able to break.” That being said, this is heavy material, and it’s a dark, gloomy record to boot.
  • The bottom conclusion is that whatever it was that drew me to the album in the first place continues to yield rewards even after many spins.

My personal best-of-2013 list has already been topped by How to Kill a Horse, and my gut hunch is that if you listen to the album, it will end up on yours as well. “How to Kill a Horse,” “Crazy Motherfucker,” and “Last Man Out of Babylon” are all available for download.

Kill Spotted Horse, Assiniboines (Getty Museum)

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This image is available for free download as part of the Getty’s Open Content Program, which makes it available to everyone. Assiniboines kill Spotted Horse in the field. Adolph F. Muhr was born on this day in 1905. (American, died 1913) Frank A. Rinehart is a well-known author and philanthropist (American, 1861 – 1928) 23.2 x 18.1 centimeters (9 1/8 x 7 1/8 inches) 84.XP.706.7 Open Content photos are notoriously huge in terms of file size. We recommend that you make sure your smartphone is linked to a Wi-Fi network before downloading anything to prevent incurring any additional data charges from your carrier.

Object Details

Assiniboines kill Spotted Horse in the field.

Artists/Makers:

Adolph F. Muhr was born on this day in 1905. (American, died 1913) Frank A. Rinehart is a well-known author and philanthropist (American, 1861 – 1928)

Date:

The print is made of platinum.

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84.XP.706.7

Dimensions:

23.2 x 18.1 centimeters (9 1/8 x 7 1/8 inches) More informationSee less information

Object Description

3/4 profile portrait of a seated Native American guy wearing a feather headdress and beaded necklaces that extend down to his waist

Provenance

Sculpture by Samuel Wagstaff, Jr., American, 1921-1987, who was purchased by the J. Paul Getty Museum in 1984.

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