How Many Cc Of Ace To Give A Horse? (Question)

  • While we are on this subject, I usually give horses 1/2 cc of ACE before their first set of shoes. We handle horses feet and trim them, but their first shoeing can still cause anxiety and set them up to fear or resent subsequent shoeings.

How much Acepromazine Can I give my horse?

Horses: 2-4 mg/100 lb of body weight. IV doses should be administered slowly, and a period of at least 15 minutes should be allowed for the drug to take full effect.

How much ace is needed to sedate a horse?

10mg/ml for Horses. AceSedate is used in practice for anaesthetic premedication, tranquillisation and sedation of horses.

Can you overdose a horse on Acepromazine?

It also may cause sudden collapse, unconsciousness, seizures, and death. Oral overdose should be treated by emptying the stomach along with monitoring and other supportive care. Phenylephrine and norepinephrine are the drugs-of-choice to treat acepromazine-induced hypotension.

Can you give ACE IM to a horse?

Acepromazine – “ace” – is a muscle relaxant that is commonly used alone or in combination with other sedatives in horses. Ace can be given IV, IM or orally for mild tranquilization.

How much ace do you give a 1000 pound horse?

Multiply your horse’s weight in pounds times the dose rate in milligrams per pound. This gives you the total number of milligrams for the dose for your horse. For example: 1,000 lb horse X 10 mg/lb = 10,000 mg. The concentration of the drug is 500 mg/ml.

How long does it take for Ace to work in horses IM?

Acepromazine can be administered by the intramuscular route, taking effect within 20-30 minutes, or may be given intravenously, taking effect within minutes. Acepromazine will cross mucous membranes and can be given orally.

How long does it take for acepromazine to kick in?

We recommend increasing the drug by 1/2 tablet at a time. Generally, the drug should be given three times a day, as needed. When a dose is given, it will take 20-30 minutes for the drug to take effect.

How much tranquilizer should I give my horse?

Drugs and dosages for sedation are given in Table 1. Drugs and dosages for anesthesia are as follows. For adult horses, add 5 to 10 mL of xylazine (100 mg/ mL) and 15 to 20 mL of ketamine (100 mg/mL) to 1 liter of 5% guaifenesin.

Can I buy acepromazine over the counter?

Do not attempt to buy acepromazine without a prescription. This is illegal.

How long does acepromazine take to wear off?

Acepromazine is a long lasting tranquilizer. It should be expected to last 6-8 hours. In extremely rare instances, some pets exhibit aggressive behavior as a reaction to acepromazine.

What is acepromazine 25mg?

Acepromazine is a tablet that is given by mouth. It is used to sedate animals for minor procedures (e.g., nail trims). It can also be used as a pre-anesthetic and as an anti-emetic to prevent vomiting due to motion sickness. This medication is not a pain reliever (analgesic).

Does ace for horses need to be refrigerated?

Acepromazine should be stored in a dark place protected from light. Tablets should be stored at room temperature in a tight container.

How long does acepromazine test in horses?

The ELISA test detects acepromazine with an I-50 of about 150 pg/ml. In vivo, it readily detects the presence of acepromazine or its metabolites in equine blood and urine from 8 to 72 hours or longer, respectively, after administration of sub-therapeutic doses.

How Many Cc Of Ace To Give A Horse?

In what amount of Cc of Ace should you give a horse? If you give it enough time to work, as little as 25 mg (0.5 cc of the 50 mg/ml acepromazine) can allow you to clip, braid, or load most horses with no trouble. Non-veterinarians should refrain from receiving intravenous medication. Allow 20 to 30 minutes for the full impact of the medicine to take effect after it has been administered intramuscularly. Can I give my horse a certain amount of acepromazine? 2-4 mg/100 lb of body weight in horses is the recommended dose.

Is it possible to overdose on acepromazine in a horse?

Oral overdoses should be handled by emptying the stomach and monitoring the patient, as well as providing various forms of supportive care.

What exactly does Ace do for horses?

Horses are considered to become more vulnerable to other sedatives and anesthetics as a result of the use of this medication.

How Many Cc Of Ace To Give A Horse – Related Questions

1 liter of 5 percent guaifenesin should have 5 to 10 mL of xylazine (100 mg/mL) and 15 to 20 mL of ketamine (100 mg/mL) added to it for use with adult horses. If you have young foals, dilute 1 liter of 5 percent guaifenesin with 5 mL of xylazine (100 mg/mL) and 10 mL of ketamine (100 mg/mL) and give them to them. Yearlings and older horses require greater dosages of xylazine and ketamine than their younger counterparts.

What is the best calming supplement for horses?

The use of magnesium or tryptophan-containing herbal products such as Quietex or Quiessence, for example, is often recommended when a horse need modest soothing. There are many other combinations of various substances, such as valerian root or Thiamine/Vitamin B1, that can be used. Mare’s Magic, which is created from raspberry leaf extract, is an alternative.

Can you overdose on acepromazine?

It is unusual to hear of cases of human acepromazine poisoning, although the clinical manifestations (central nervous system depression, respiratory depression, hypotension) are comparable to those seen with other phenothiazines.

Is Ace safe for horses?

Ace has no negative side effects in the majority of horses. Stallions, horses in shock, and horses suffering from anemia should all be treated with caution. Ace has been shown to reduce blood pressure and hemoglobin concentration. With urethral irritation, Ace can produce penile prolapse and priapism (constant erection), which are both dangerous in stallions and geldings.

What do vets use to sedate horses?

Sedatives are medications that make horses asleep and are often used for brief veterinary treatments on horses.

Xylazine (Rompun), detomidine (Dormosedan), and romifidine (Rompun) are all sedatives that are often used (SediVet). All of these medications have a limited duration of action and give some pain relief through drowsiness.

Does ace for horses need to be refrigerated?

It is recommended that you keep acepromazine in a dark, dry area away from direct sunlight. Tablets should be kept at room temperature in an airtight container to maintain their effectiveness.

Can you give a horse Rompun orally?

Horses: In the following situations, Rompun® (xylazine injection) has been used successfully: 1. Diagnostic procedures, which include oral and ocular examinations, abdominal palpation, rectal palpation, vaginal examination, bladder catheterization, and radiographic examinations.

Is Ace bad for geldings?

It is OK to deliver acepromazine to geldings prior to anesthetic recovery, but the dose should not be greater than 4 mg (0.008 mg/kg), because this amount appears to be too low to elicit penile protrusion.

What happens if a person takes a horse tranquilizer?

According to the findings of the study, xylazine may have a depressant effect on the central nervous and respiratory systems in humans, resulting in low blood pressure and a sluggish heart rate. When it is mixed with opiates to form “tranq dope,” it has the potential to be lethal.

What is Bute for horses?

Phenylbutazone (Bute) is an analgesic (pain-relieving) and anti-inflammatory medicine that is extensively used in the treatment of lameness in horses, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association. It is a member of a class of pharmaceuticals called as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (NSAIDS).

Do calming supplements really work for horses?

Different calming supplements can be quite effective on certain horses while being ineffective on others. If you plan on participating in a show or competition, make sure to read the rules and regulations of the association in which you will be competing to see if there are any limits on the compounds that are used in the calming supplements.

How do you calm a horse naturally?

Natural components such as chamomile, valerian root, and raspberry leaf, all of which are traditionally used as calming agents, can be included in certain supplements. “These may be beneficial to certain horses while being detrimental to others,” Johnson explains.

What can you give a horse for anxiety?

Supplements such as Kauffman’s® Calming Pellets can aid in the reduction of stress and anxiety in your horse’s nervous system.

What drugs are used to put a horse down?

Most veterinarians in the United States use the barbiturate pentobarbital as the lethal injection procedure, which is the approach most often used in the world today.

How do you prepare a horse for cutting?

After removing heated garments from the horse, wrap him or her in a rug and allow him or her overnight to dry. Rugging the horse will also assist in warming the animal up and laying the hair flat, making it simpler to trim the horse’s mane and tail. When the horse is completely dry, give him or her another thorough brushing with a body brush and coat shine if you choose.

Is sedation safe for horses?

Sedation looks to be a fairly low-risk therapy for the horse, based on current evidence. It is rare for a horse to experience side effects, which include falling over, choking (if the horse consumes food before completely awake), and colic (very low risk for short procedures).

Can humans get high on acepromazine?

Acepromazine is a medication that is seldom used in human medicine, and incidences of acepromazine poisoning are extremely rare.

As a result, very little is known regarding its toxicity in humans at this time. We provide the results of acepromazine concentrations in the blood and other tissues from a suicide case in which the victim died as a consequence of acepromazine self-poisoning.

Is acepromazine reversible?

There is no analgesic effect from acepromazine, and it is not reversible.

How long does horse sedation last?

An hour or so after administration, the sedative effects of a medication will often wear off. The exact time varies on a variety of conditions, and some horses may “wake up” after 30 minutes, while others will remain stunned for an hour and a half after being stunned.

How long does ACP take to work in horses?

ACP is a member of a class of medicines known as phenothiazines. As a result, regardless of the method of administration, it might take up to 30 minutes to take effect, making it critical to wait the necessary length of time before attempting to do the action for which your horse has been sedated by your veterinarian.

Can Dormosedan be given orally?

HUMAN SAFETY INFORMATION: Because safety studies have shown that detomidine hydrochloride is well absorbed when delivered orally, caution should be exercised to prevent the medicine from being accidentally consumed.

ACE.

okhorseloverReg. Feb 2016 Posted2016-06-128:38 PMSubject:RE: ACE.
Elite VeteranPosts: 787 FLITASTIC – 2016-06-1011:58 PMokhorselover – 2016-06-103:57 PMMy shoer made a great comment about aceing horse’s that are hard to shoe. What he doesn’t like is the horse being under the influence doesn’t learn. They are drugged. The best thing is to TEACH your horse to be good for the shoer. I feel the same goes for training. I want my horse’s to LEARN, not be drugged to learn. They can’t retain training if under the influence. Just a thought for you. Personally I would never ace my horse to train them. If I can’t ride them un drugged, I better get my act together or find a better trainer to start them. I respectfully disagree and so does my performance horse vet. She used to work for s very prominent Thorobred race horse farm and they used small doses of ace to train colts in the starting gate. It gives them an absolute ” positive ” experience. Once they learned it was a positive place they no longer had to use it. I have talked to a lot of people that use it and when used correctly in small doses it certainly ALLOWS them to think and learn. It’s the same concept for kids with ADHD. If they are unable to control themselves in school they are not learning. Once they get dosage correct the child is able to manage impulses, sit quietly, and pay attention to the lessons in school.That is ok, to each their own. I have used ace on a weanling we had because we needed to freeze brand hershe wasn’t going to have anything to do with itwe didn’t want her to hurt herself in the stocks. I’m not against using it as there are times one may need to, to protect the horse, but as far as training one goes, I have never had or needed to use it. Best to youyour horse.
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cheryl makofkaReg. Jan 2011 Posted2016-06-1210:24 PMSubject:RE: ACE.
The Advice GuruPosts: 6419 FLITASTIC – 2016-06-1011:58 PMokhorselover – 2016-06-103:57 PMMy shoer made a great comment about aceing horse’s that are hard to shoe. What he doesn’t like is the horse being under the influence doesn’t learn. They are drugged. The best thing is to TEACH your horse to be good for the shoer. I feel the same goes for training. I want my horse’s to LEARN, not be drugged to learn. They can’t retain training if under the influence. Just a thought for you. Personally I would never ace my horse to train them. If I can’t ride them un drugged, I better get my act together or find a better trainer to start them. I respectfully disagree and so does my performance horse vet. She used to work for s very prominent Thorobred race horse farm and they used small doses of ace to train colts in the starting gate. It gives them an absolute ” positive ” experience. Once they learned it was a positive place they no longer had to use it. I have talked to a lot of people that use it and when used correctly in small doses it certainly ALLOWS them to think and learn. It’s the same concept for kids with ADHD. If they are unable to control themselves in school they are not learning. Once they get dosage correct the child is able to manage impulses, sit quietly, and pay attention to the lessons in school. Each person to their own, but I am not sure your performance vet would endorse using ace on a regular basis as a training aid.I do find that vets are stuck in between a rock and a hard place as they are trying to do the best they can for the horse, but their hands are tied(or they feel this way) as the owner/trainer are wanting a quick fix, the miracle drug, or have too high of expectations for the animal they have.Everything is controlled by the dollar, and vets are very conscious about this, they are trying to give their client the cheapest fix possible that way they do not loose the business of said client.
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FLITASTICReg. Jun 2012 Posted2016-06-1210:59 PMSubject:RE: ACE.
ExpertPosts: 5117 cheryl makofka – 2016-06-128:24 PMFLITASTIC – 2016-06-1011:58 PMokhorselover – 2016-06-103:57 PMMy shoer made a great comment about aceing horse’s that are hard to shoe. What he doesn’t like is the horse being under the influence doesn’t learn. They are drugged. The best thing is to TEACH your horse to be good for the shoer. I feel the same goes for training. I want my horse’s to LEARN, not be drugged to learn. They can’t retain training if under the influence. Just a thought for you. Personally I would never ace my horse to train them. If I can’t ride them un drugged, I better get my act together or find a better trainer to start them. I respectfully disagree and so does my performance horse vet. She used to work for s very prominent Thorobred race horse farm and they used small doses of ace to train colts in the starting gate. It gives them an absolute ” positive ” experience. Once they learned it was a positive place they no longer had to use it. I have talked to a lot of people that use it and when used correctly in small doses it certainly ALLOWS them to think and learn. It’s the same concept for kids with ADHD. If they are unable to control themselves in school they are not learning. Once they get dosage correct the child is able to manage impulses, sit quietly, and pay attention to the lessons in school. Each person to their own, but I am not sure your performance vet would endorse using ace on a regular basis as a training aid.I do find that vets are stuck in between a rock and a hard place as they are trying to do the best they can for the horse, but their hands are tied(or they feel this way) as the owner/trainer are wanting a quick fix, the miracle drug, or have too high of expectations for the animal they have.Everything is controlled by the dollar, and vets are very conscious about this, they are trying to give their client the cheapest fix possible that way they do not loose the business of said client. I totally get that. And your probably right. Mine is very temporary. Like I got a 50 cc bottle and thought to myself there would be no way I would use all of it. Lol not even close. I have been with my vet 20 years and she is booked absolutely full. Can’t take any more clients so money or losing me is not part of her particular decision making. But I have used young vets in emergencies that tried to charge me 20.00 for a roll of vet wrap. Lol I feel sorry for large animal vets. They don’t get near as much money as small animal ones. Lol
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giving ace to calm a nervous horse for a ride

If done correctly, it is effective. I think that extra training is a wiser decision in this situation. However, it should be noted that some horses experience significant levels of fear when they are put out with a big group of horses they are unfamiliar with. Some horses have a difficult time remaining calm in a large group, much as some people struggle to maintain their composure in large groups and ‘fall apart’ when placed in the wrong environment. For several hours before I would give an ACE to a horse, I would tether it to the ground at the practices of some of the most active and boisterous horse organizations around.

  1. Unless it is done incorrectly, I do not believe that it is ever hazardous to its rider or others.
  2. 1/2 to 1 cc for a 1000-1200horse, taken orally, has been reported to be effective in reducing stress levels.
  3. Always administer it while the horse is calm, rather than when it becomes agitated, furious, or nervous.
  4. They make no stumbling or ‘tranquilized’ movements at all.
  5. Have you ever heard someone remark to someone else, “You need to have a drink before you go to your class!” or something similar?
  6. I’ve seen numerous horses who were given a 1/2 cc ACE dosage and then taken on two or three huge trail rides, and by the fourth or fifth trail ride, they were no longer in need of any assistance.
  7. I would always start with 1/2 cc orally to get a feel for things.

If that did not work, I would resort to tying the horse up in crowded areas where there were a lot of horses again.

While we’re on the issue of horses, I normally give them 1/2 cc of ACE before they have their first pair of shoes on them.

Consequently, I give horses that are new to shoeing 1/2 cc before loading them onto the trailer for the 45-minute drive to the horse shoeing school in Ardmore.

They maintain a respectful silence during shoeing.

Perhaps they would have been just as good if not for the ACE; perhaps they would not.

This is something I’ve only been doing for at least 30 years.

Why not make anything easy for the horse if you can?

An animal who enters a state known as “reactive mode” will learn nothing except that shoeing is an unpleasant experience and will avoid shoeing in the future. We’ve all had to deal with horses who had a poor shoeing experience, and it might take years to get them back on their feet after that event.

Acepromazine maleate Injection for Animal Use

Federal legislation restricts the use of this medication to licensed veterinarians or those acting on their orders. Acepromazine maleate injection, a strong neuroleptic drug with a low order of toxicity, is particularly useful in the tranquilization of dogs, cats, and horses, as well as in the treatment of epilepsy in humans. The fact that it takes effect quickly and has no hypnotic effect are further advantages. The variety of conceivable applications for this chemical in veterinary medicine, according to Baker, 1is only limited by the practitioner’s creative imagination.

Acepromazinephenothiazin-2-yl-methyl ketone] is an acepromazinephenothiazin-2-yl-methyl ketone.

It takes action quickly, bringing you a noticeable and immediate relaxing effect.

Acepromazine maleate injection is particularly beneficial as a preanesthetic drug since it may be used to (1) increase and extend the effects of barbiturates, hence minimizing the need for general anesthesia, and (2) as an adjuvant to surgery performed under local anaesthetic, among other things.

When combined with local anesthetic, this technique is particularly beneficial for firing, castration, neurectomy, excision of skin cancers, ocular surgery, and the application of plaster casts.

Dosage and Administration

The dosage should be tailored to the individual in order to achieve the desired level of tranquilization. According to a general rule of thumb, as the weight of the animal grows, the dose needed in milligrams per kilogram of body weight decreases. Acepromazine maleate injection can be administered intravenously, intramuscularly, or subcutaneously, depending on the patient’s preference. It is possible to use the following schedule as a guidance for IV, IM, and SC injections. 0.25-0.5 mg per pound of body weight in dogs Cats: 0.5-1 mg/lb of body weight (0.5-1 mg/kg).

Contraindications

According to the level of tranquilization necessary, the dosage should be tailored accordingly. According to a general rule of thumb, as the weight of the animal grows, the dose needed in milligrams per kilogram of body weight reduces accordingly. An intravenous, intramuscular, or subcutaneous injection of acepromazine maleate may be administered. A guidance to IV, IM, and SC injections may be found in the following schedule. 0.25-0.5 mg/lb of body weight in dogs is recommended.

cats:0.5-1 mg/lb of body weight (0.5-1 mg/kg of body weight) 2-4 mg/100 lb of body weight in horses is the recommended dosage. Slowly administering IV dosages is recommended, and allowing the medicine to have full action should be permitted at least 15 minutes after the dose has been provided.

Warning

Horses destined for human consumption should not be treated with this medication.

Precautions

Anxiolytics, often known as tranquilizers, are powerful central nervous system depressants that can produce considerable drowsiness as well as inhibition of the sympathetic nervous system. Using excessive quantities of tranquilizers or administering them to sensitive animals might result in protracted depression or motor restlessness. Tranquilizers have an additive effect on the activities of other depressants, and they can increase the effectiveness of general anesthesia. A tranquilizer should be used with caution and in reduced dosages during general anesthesia, as well as in animals displaying signs of stress, debilitation, heart illness (including sympathetic blockade), hypovolemia (including hypovolemia), or shock (including shock).

  1. Acepromazine maleate injection, like other phenothiazine derivatives, is detoxified in the liver; consequently, it should be administered with caution in these animals.
  2. Epinephrine is contraindicated in the treatment of acute hypotension caused by phenothiazine-derived tranquilizers because it has the potential to cause additional blood pressure lowering.
  3. A paralysis of the retractor penis muscle in horses has been connected with the use of phenothiazine-derived tranquilizers, according to the literature.
  4. Prior to administering Acepromazine maleate injection to male horses, it is important to carefully assess the risks associated with it (castrated and uncastrated).
  5. The distinction between reversible protrusion of the penis (a typical clinical indication of narcosis) and irreversible paralysis of the retractor muscle is difficult to make over the course of a tranquilization.
  6. It has been hypothesized that when a tranquilizer is administered in combination with testosterone, such paralysis may develop (or in stallions).

Adverse Reactions

Following oral or parenteral administration of acepromazine, a few extremely uncommon but potentially fatal cases of idiosyncratic responses to the drug have been reported in dogs. These potentially life-threatening adverse responses in dogs include behavioral abnormalities such as aggressiveness, biting/chewing, and anxiety, among other things. Call 1-855-724-3461 to report suspected adverse reactions, acquire a Safety Data Sheet, or receive technical support. FDA may be reached at 1-888-FDA-VETS or by email for further information on adverse drug experience reporting for animal medications.

  1. Acute and chronic toxicity investigations have revealed that the toxicity is of a very low level.
  2. The following were the results of the study: 2 The intravenous route contains 61.37 mg/kg.
  3. Chronic toxicity: In rats, tests 3 demonstrated that there were no negative effects on renal or hepatic function, as well as on hemopoietic activity.
  4. Hematologic and urinalysis investigations revealed results that were within normal ranges.

Acepromazine maleate injection, when taken intramuscularly, gives a temporary feeling of stinging that is akin to that experienced with other phenothiazine tranquilizers in the short term.

Effectiveness

Acepromazine maleate injection has been the subject of controlled clinical investigations in the United States and Canada, which have proved its usefulness and safety as a tranquilizer. The use of Acepromazine maleate injection in dogs, cats, and horses for restraint during examinations, treatments, and minor surgery, as well as for pre-anesthetic sedation, has been shown to provide good to exceptional outcomes 1,4,5. According to reports, the medicine 4aid in the treatment of convulsions linked with distemper in dogs.

Bauman 6reported positive results in horses when he used the medication as a help in the treatment of painful spasms caused by colic.

A study conducted on more than 200 horses with a wide range of illnesses found that Acepromazine maleate injection was both effective and safe when given intravenously.

Storage

Store at temperatures ranging from 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F), with excursions permissible between 15° and 30°C (59° and 86°F). When used as directed, there is no restriction on the number of punctures that can be made for the whole expiration time.

How Supplied

Acepromazine maleate injection is delivered in vials of 50 mL each, which can be used several times. 10 mg/mL in a 50 mL vial (NDC 11695-0095-5).

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References

Paper delivered in Toronto, Canada, in 1958 at a conference of the Ontario Veterinary Association (now known as the Ontario Veterinary Society). ClinByla Laboratories, Paris, France, publishes Pharmacology Reports. 2. 3. M.G. Stegen, Pharmacology Report, Ayerst Laboratories, 1958. Ayerst Laboratories’ Veterinary Medical Records are number four. J.T. Foley’s Clinical Reports to Ayerst Laboratories was published in 1963. The Clinical Reports to Ayerst Laboratories were written by W.G. Bauman in 1963.

  • Ford, R.W., in Equine Panel Report, Mod.
  • Pract.40:45 (Nov.1) 1959, in Equine Panel Report, Mod.
  • Pract.
  • 1, 1959).
  • The product is distributed by Covetrus North America at 400 Metro Place North in Dublin, Ohio.
  • Questions about AH-Acepromazine Injection-03?
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50 mL 003845 REV: 0919AH-003845-03382703-0587018822

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Acepromazine

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Description

Acepromazine has a depressive impact on the central nervous system, resulting in drowsiness, muscle relaxation, and a general decrease in activity levels in the patient.

It is one among the most often used tranquilizers because of its quick action, which produces an almost instantaneous calming effect with a low level of toxicity.

Usage

Acepromazine is a tranquilizer with a short duration of action that is used to keep unruly horses under control during examinations, treatments, trailer loading, and transportation. Also widely used in combination with local anesthetic for a variety of surgical operations, including castration, the excision of skin tumors, eye surgery, and neurectomy, is acepromazine. Occasionally, acepromazine is used for the treatment of laminitis because it decreases blood pressure through dilation of tiny blood vessels, therefore increasing circulation in the hoof.

Dosage and Administration

Acepromazine
Method Dosage(click row for calculator) Concentration Period Duration
Oral 0.25-1.0 mg/lb 10 mg/tablet Treatment NA
Oral 0.25-1.0 mg/lb 25 mg/tablet Treatment NA
Intramuscular injection 2-4 mg/100lb 10 mg/ml Treatment NA
Intravenous injection 2-4 mg/100lb 10 mg/ml Treatment NA

Notes:

  • Federal legislation restricts the use of this medication to licensed veterinarians or those acting on their behalf. Horses are given oral pills that are extra-labeled. The dosage should be adjusted in accordance with the level of tranquilization that is desired. Dosages delivered intravenously (IV) should be given gently, and a time of 15 minutes should be allowed for the medicine to have full action
  • The calculator is intended solely for educational purposes. Follow the directions provided by your veterinarian before using this, or any other medicine.

Side Effects

It has been shown that the retractor penis muscle is paralyzed when this class of tranquilizers is administered. Before administering Acepromazine Maleate Injection to male horses, it is important to evaluate the possibility of this occurrence. To achieve the intended effect, dosage should be kept to a minimum and confined to the bare minimum. It is important to note that it is typical to see the reversible protrusion of the penis throughout the administration process. It is possible to have permanent paralysis of the retractor penis muscle if a sedative is taken in combination with testosterone treatment (or in stallions).

Precautions

Anxiolytics, often known as tranquilizers, are powerful central nervous system depressants that elicit substantial drowsiness as well as inhibition of the sympathetic nervous system. Tranquilizers, when used excessively, can cause depression and motor restlessness in animals, which may be exacerbated in animals who are sensitive to the medication. Tranquilizers have an additive impact on the body, which means they will enhance the effects of general anesthesia. When used in combination with general anesthesia, caution should be used, including the administration of lesser dosages and paying closer attention to the patient’s metabolic reaction.

It is important to remember that Acepromazine Maleate Injection is detoxified in the liver and should be used with caution in animals that have a history of liver failure or leukopenia.

Symptoms of an accidental intracarotid injection range from confusion to convulsive convulsions and death, depending on the location.

Acepromazine is a drug that is restricted in the majority of sanctioned contests.

Interactions

Acipromazine has been shown to enhance the toxicity of organophosphates in several studies.

Acepromazine Maleat Injection should not be used to manage tremors that occur as a consequence of organic phosphate poisoning. Use with caution if you are taking procain hydrochloride.

Overdose

Acute and chronic toxicity investigations have revealed that the toxicity is of a very low level.

Images

Acepromazine maleate injection is a medication used to treat anxiety. Acepromazine pills are used to treat anxiety.

Acepromazine 10 mg/ml Solution

Acepromazine (abbreviated as “ace”) is a muscle relaxant that is extensively used in horses, either alone or in conjunction with other sedatives. Ace can be administered intravenously, intramuscularly, or orally to provide moderate tranquilization. Ace, on the other hand, has no pain-relieving properties; it is not an analgesic. Despite the fact that ace is widely available in the horse world, ace is a prescription drug that should only be administered under the supervision of a veterinarian.

  1. Even though ace might be effective in certain situations, it should not be utilized as a substitute for excellent horsemanship in all situations.
  2. Horses are considered to become more vulnerable to other sedatives and anesthetics as a result of the use of this medication.
  3. Historically, it has been believed that ace helps to promote circulation in the hoof and lower leg.
  4. Ace is also occasionally used in conjunction with intravenous fluids in the treatment of tying-up patients (exertional rhabdomyolysis).

Acepromazine Maleate

DescriptionAcepromazine is an extremely helpful sedative that depresses the central nervous system, inducing drowsiness, relaxation, and a decrease in involuntary movements. It is also known as PromAce or Promazine Granules or Tranquazine in some countries. It does not, however, give any pain relief, and it will not prevent a horse from moving or kicking (although at a slower pace) if it is frightened or in discomfort. The use of a sedative to aid handling of the animal during diagnostic tests, veterinary treatments, transportation or other conditions that need the use of a “tranquilizer” is permissible.

  • ADMINISTRATION DOSE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE Treatment with 2-4 mg100 IBM of body weight per kilogram of body weight is indicated for intravenous and intramuscular injection.
  • The use of dosages of 0.5-1 mgl100 Ib.
  • The dosage of ACEPROMAZINE MALEATE must be tailored to the patient’s needs.
  • There is currently no oral formulation of acepromazine on the market.
  • (See Promazine hydrochloride for further information.) When administered intravenously, the entire impact takes roughly 15 minutes to take effect.
  • Following administration of the medication, horses should be allowed to rest undisturbed for the optimum results.
  • When dealing with delicate animals, this will take longer.

PRECAUTIONS ARE EXTREMELY SPECIFIC The Central Nervous System is comprised of the following parts: Excitation and disorientation, as well as convulsions, seizures, and even death, can result from an accidental intra-arterial injection, most commonly into the carotid artery during injections into the neck.

  • These studies, on the other hand, exclusively consider the possibility of death or major organ harm.
  • It should also be mentioned that the capacity to swallow is hampered in animals that have been excessively tranquilized.
  • ACEPROZINE injected intravenously too quickly can cause hypertension in any horse, and this can be fatal if the drug is not supplied slowly enough.
  • Use of ACEPROMAZINE under any of these conditions is expressly prohibited and should be avoided.
  • As a result, the penis becomes more relaxed and the second sheath is dropped out.
  • Before administering acepromazine to an intact male horse, it is important to evaluate the risks involved.
  • Horseman’s Observations: While riding or training for different trainers in my earlier days, I had a few of dozens of encounters with this stuff in training when I was younger (small doses, only 1 cc).

In addition, the horses appeared to fatigue more quickly when on this medication.

It was also clear that the horses’ learning pace had been significantly slowed, since they were frequently unaware of what was going on and their attention/interest in the activity had been much diminished.

More information may be found on this website.

If you need to utilize Ace for horseback riding or horse training, it is preferable to have either more information or more experience beforehand.

It is being abused if it is being utilized in place of proper training.

oLoading the horse into the trailer before it has received sufficient training.

(It’s a little like being a belligerent drunk.) (One person is delighted when dunk, while the other gets enraged.) oWhen administered to an already aroused horse, I’ve found that the horses can put up a hard battle, which has resulted in injuries to both people and animals, and the medicine has never been able to accomplish the goal for which it was intended.

  1. (Giving enough alcohol to a person who is already angry or upset can frequently end in a show of craziness; Ace can do the same to a horse) Ace has a distinct effect on horses than any other medicine, just as all pharmaceuticals do.
  2. I have personally observed the “backfire” (i.e., the reverse) impact of this medication on occasion.
  3. It is possible to complete the task successfully without the horse “hanging.” According to my own experience in the following disciplines, the usage of Ace is highly recommended: To alleviate the animal’s “shipping anxiety,” but not before the animal has received suitable loading instruction.
  4. That is, if you have any notion what “your” horse is in the first place.
  5. I’ve used it as an emergency therapy when a horse became “tied up” when there was no other medication available and when a veterinarian was not immediately accessible.
  6. When a horse ties up, it can cause considerable complications, and it is never as small as it may look to many people.
  7. If Ace was being used as a prophylactic precaution in “tying up,” it never worked for me.
  8. However, I feel that educating the animal in many of the areas where the medicine is utilized will help to reduce the needless use or misuse of Ace in the long run.

Veterinarians frequently combine this medication with other tranquilizers in order to maximize efficacy. No one (except from a veterinarian) should attempt to experiment in this sector.

How much ace to give to a warmblood?

Discussion on How much ace to give to a warmblood?
Author Message
Posted on Sunday, Feb 11, 2007 – 10:34 am:We have a gelding who was kicked just below the elbow joint. After several weeks of stall restwe started him back to work.At first we injected 1 cc of ace 30 minutes before turning him out in a small arena and have progressed to where he is trotting in a large paddock for at least two hours a day. The ground is frozen so the horse doesn’t “let loose”About three weeks agowe started to ride him in a small indoor arena where he was bucking/hopping at the canter. We give him IM one cc of ace 30 minutes before tacking him up and by 40 minutes you can see his eye turnglassy.OUr problem is that we now are riding him in a larger arena where the footing is softer, not frozen, and more room for him to work. The last two rides have been difficult with him wanting to buck 20 or more times. We have lounged himand turned him out ina smaller arena where the footing is hard as a rock due to our temps in the teens sothe horse knows he can’t let loose. Instead of giving him the 1cc I would like to increase the dose by a half and dose him with 1.5cc. He weighs about 1300 to 1400 lbs.What do you think would help? A higher dose? A longer weight period?Do I need to just increase by 0.5cc until we find the correct dose to take the edge off?We are in a winter freeze area. We tried not to ace him and this was a huge mistake. We also can not turn him out or lounge him in the bigger arena where the footing is great cause the barn rules do not allow this. We are boarders and I was firmly warned never to lounge in their new large indoor arena. I must respect the barn rules.My daughter rides the beast and I know the horse just needs to gallop, roll, and buck like a wild beast.I would love help since I was left with a 50cc bottle and ten syringes but no guidelines. I learned how to give IMby hitting the internet.
Member:stevens Posted on Sunday, Feb 11, 2007 – 11:59 am:Can’t help with the dosage, suggest you ask the vet that left it with you.I’m curious as to what this fellow is eating.He’s obviously a big boy, my boy’s 17.2 and 1200 pounds.You may want to consider decreasing the energy in his diet.Is your daughter able to keep him at a walk?If so, if she can walk him for a long time, 20-30 minutes, before any trot or canter work that may help.If she can keep him at the trot, you may want to just trot and not canter since he’s coming off lay up.Changes of pace and direction can also help keep his mind on business.Good luck.Chris
Moderator:DrO Posted on Monday, Feb 12, 2007 – 6:08 am:Welcome devonhil,Though I cannot recommend the safety of this procedure and if you have weighed the pros and cons and decided this is the safest way to approach this problem, a 1/2cc increase in a horse this big is unlikely to make a lot of difference and you are starting at less than what is recommended in the article for this purpose, considering your horses weight.I would add a cc each time until I got the desired effect: a quiet horse that remains coordinated enough to be safely ridden. The article gives optimal wait times following administration.Chris’s points are good and their is more information on this topic at,TrainingConditioning Horses » Behavioral Problems » Stall Resting Horses.DrO
New Member:devonhil Posted on Monday, Feb 12, 2007 – 11:19 am:”a quiet horse that remains coordinated enough to be safely ridden.” is the goal.As soon as the injury occurred I lowered his grain. Since we live in a very cold area we need the grain tokeep weight on the boy. I would unblanket completely twice a week to see if he was becoming fat from the stall rest or DrOpping weight since we have had temperatures in the single digits for several weeks.We rode him in a small arena to have “control” but the footing here is hard as ice. When we took him to the bigger indoor we would keep him in a quarter section. At a walk the boy was trying to stretch and buck. We have been approaching this carefully and slowly. At first he was manageable with just a cc of acebut since he feels great and the footing is so nice at a walk /trot is not want he wants and we ride him in a small section.We have considered Chris’ thoughts and do keep to a plan. As forvet advice, I have called him six times in two weeks asking what I should do.So I am placing my child on a horse who is feeling very good while giving IM shots wondering what is the appropriate dose and how long will the effect take and last. I will reread the ace article again. I will read the article on stall rest horses. I also have made a diary listing how long the ace takes to work, how long it lasts, and how long we work the horse and what type of work he has done.I do thank youfor posting cause I no longer feelalone in handling the problem and I need to care for both the horse and my child’s safety.I amalso going to verify the horse’s weight.MY fear is seeing the horse stumble from sedation while the child is on him. Hey, I know one martini is my limit.I will post what my horse’s preferred cocktail is.
Member:stevens Posted on Monday, Feb 12, 2007 – 7:05 pm:devonhill,Best of luck to you; I certainly don’t envy you this situation.I hope it all works out well and safely for everyone.Chris
Member:jockyrdg Posted on Monday, Feb 12, 2007 – 7:33 pm:Hello Devon,I see you also live in the Garden State. Following on Chris’ good advice, check what he is eating again. Grain is not going to keep him warm and from losing weight to the cold – hay will. Increasing hay, particularly when the temps go into the 20’s helps to keep them warm and occupied when there isn’t much else going on. Adding oil will also increase the calories with less excitement. You might want to discuss your feed with Dr. Sarah Ralston at Rutger’s Equine department – your tax dollars are supporting the work there and she is most helpful to the natives. Good luck. Your daughter’s safety has to be the major focus here, not everyone’s bravery.
Moderator:DrO Posted on Tuesday, Feb 13, 2007 – 7:27 am:Remember that while most horses have a place where they can remain calm without becoming stumbly not all do: the area where you reach calm overlaps a significant stumbling dose. And while an adult experimenting with this is one thing, I would have the same butterflies you do with a child.Considering your concerns in your last post devonhill perhaps a professional to get the wild beast tamed again? Or even better how about move to a place this horse can get out and let loose for a few days before riding?DrO
New Member:devonhil Posted on Wednesday, Feb 14, 2007 – 3:02 pm:I have ridden the boy twice since posting and found that doing the following has made the sedation more effective.I retaped the boy and found he weighed less than told by my vet.I increased the dose to 1.5cc of ACE and increased the time to an hour before starting any activity. An hour after I had IM the sedative I tacked him up. We were able todo flatwork for an hour without any major issues. Oh he had some life to his stridebutthis was manageable.I needed to find the correct dose without having the horse dragging his tail and still have muscle coordination.THanks for the help.
Member:stevens Posted on Wednesday, Feb 14, 2007 – 4:44 pm:Congratulations!Good luck on the road to recovery with him.
Moderator:DrO Posted on Thursday, Feb 15, 2007 – 7:02 am:Delighted that you found a working dose. What did he tape at devonhil?DrO
Member:kbr1 Posted on Thursday, Feb 15, 2007 – 8:01 pm:I read the article on ‘Stall Rest’ and the use of ace. I have a 7 year old Arab/App that has a bowed tendon (low bow). She has been confined to the stall, something I only usually do at feeding time. She did pretty well for the first week then she started getting worked up during the day when the other two left her. My vet gave me ace to give her, he said up to 3cc’s but to give it to her orally. What would be the reason to give an injection v/s orally (with my horse I know she hates injections). I stayed home from work today and gave her only 1cc, I may need to up it a little bit. She is on the small side. This stall rest situation is really difficult, we go out for very short walks in the afternoons. Hopefully she can have a small (12×12) paddock area soon.
Moderator:DrO Posted on Friday, Feb 16, 2007 – 7:09 am:Oral use will have a slower onset of action, a longer duration of sedation, and less “peak” sedation.DrO

Sedatives and Sedation in Horses

In our practice, we frequently sedate horses — it’s probably the most common “normal” procedure that we perform, second only to vaccination. So what exactly are we doing? What is the mechanism of action of the medications – and why does it not always operate in the same way? “Sedation is defined as “a condition of relaxation or sleep. induced by the administration of a sedative substance.” That’s the definition from the dictionary, and it makes it seem wonderful and straightforward — administer a medicine, and the patient falls asleep.

  1. It’s important to note that a sedated horse does not lie down, but rather their head lowers and lowers until they require something to rest on to keep them from falling over.
  2. There are times when it appears that the horse is still somewhat aware of what is going on around them, but they are too drowsy to be bothered to pay attention to it.
  3. We prefer to employ sedation in a variety of settings, which includes the following.
  4. There are differences amongst horses in this regard.
  5. The following are perhaps the most prevalent reasons we sedate horses:.
  6. 2) Roughing up the teeth, especially when using power rasps and dremel tools.
  7. This is due to the fact that sedation is far safer than general anesthesia.

It’s crucial to note that all sedatives have a temporary effect on the way the horse’s brain and body function, and that they might have a negative influence on the heart and circulation system.

Although an overdose of a sedative is unlikely to be deadly in a healthy horse, it can still be harmful, especially if the horse has an underlying condition that makes them less effective at managing their blood pressure levels.

There have been cases of horses who were being treated with a (very safe) antibiotic (TMPS), but the owner failed to inform the veterinarian of this, and the combination of the sedative and the antibiotic caused the horse to have a heart attack (technically, a fatal arrhythmia).

The most ineffective, least potent, and least dependable method of sedated a horse, but it has two advantages: it does not necessitate the attendance of a veterinarian, and it does not necessitate being so near to the horse to administer it.

ACP tablets are occasionally used instead of ACP paste, though there are strict guidelines for when a veterinarian can prescribe tablets instead of paste.

Because it is absorbed across the membranes in the mouth, it should not be administered with meals.

Numerous injectable sedatives may be administered intramuscularly — this injection is more dependable than administration by mouth, but needs significantly greater dosages than administration intravenously (in my experience, you need 4-5 times as much, and it takes about twice as long to work).

When a seriously colicing horse must be transported to a medical center over a considerable distance, I’ve used it in a couple of other situations on rare occasions.

3) Through the use of intravenous injection.

This is what I’ll be focussing on in the next sections.

This is a very “dirty” substance, in that it has a wide range of effects on a variety of physiological systems.

Keeping in mind that after drowsiness has been established, raising the dose WILL NOT result in deeper sedation, but rather will result in greater negative effects.

There are two negative effects in particular that we as veterinarians keep an eye out for while treating patients with ACP.

The second action is significantly more intriguing – ACP is a modest muscular relacant of particular muscle types, which makes it effective in the treatment of azoturia and choking, among other conditions.

This is the muscle that keeps the penis contained within the sheath, and even modest dosages of ACP frequently result in male horses “dropping” their penis completely.

In severe situations, this might be permanent or can result in gangrene, which necessitates amputation.

It does have a role in sedation though, since it may frequently be used in conjunction with another medicine to extend drowsiness, allowing the dosages of the individual drugs in each element of the combination to be reduced, thereby minimizing the risk of adverse effects.

So when your veterinarian refuses to give you the medications, they aren’t attempting to take advantage of you; rather, they are simply following the law.

It’s generally butorphanol that’s utilized, which is a synthetic opiate (it’s a mu/kappa agonist/antagonist that’s linked to buprenorphine, for those who are interested) that has a reasonable painkilling effect while also potentiating the sedation that may be obtained from other medicines.

However, it’s important to remember that any other opiates (such as Pethidine or Fentanyl) that the horse is given up to about 8 hours later will not work quite as well as they should because the butorphanol will partially inhibit their activity.

Alpha-2 medications work by deceiving the body into believing it has created excessive amounts of adrenaline, causing it to cease generating it, resulting in consistent deep drowsiness and sleep.

In general, three medicines with somewhat varied qualities are utilized, each with a different mechanism of action.

For oral administration, detomidine is also available in a syringe.

It’s particularly useful when sedating horses for nerve blocks or other procedures in which they must be completely recovered and able to trot up within half an hour of being sedated.

I’ll next double-check to make sure it’s not on any medications, and then provide intravenous sedative.

ACP is added to the mix for longer-lasting treatments or if I desire muscular relaxation (which is very important for dental procedures when I want the tongue to be lovely and floppy!).

Generally speaking, the larger a horse’s body weight, the less sedative per kilo of body weight it requires (so Shetlands often need as much as a light hunter).

Another thing to keep in mind is that seemingly identical horses, under the same circumstances, can react very differently.

The depth of sedation you desire will, of course, depend on your preferences; but, I’ve found that if you aim for “mild sedation” to begin with, you will almost always find yourself having to top the horse up halfway through.

If the horse becomes aroused while you are waiting for the sedative to take effect, the sedative will not be effective.

During the process, it may be required to fill up the fluids, which is perfectly OK because the medications we employ work quickly enough intravenously that you can monitor their effects in real time or close to it.

On rare occasions, I’ve had a horse that refused to wake up or that went too far into the stall.

Though extremely costly, it is effective in reversing the effects of alpha-2 medications within minutes or seconds — and once they are reversed, the horse awakens in an astonishingly short period of time.

The most important goal is to enable us to treat your horse as effectively and humanely as possible. For any concerns you may have about your horse or pony, please consult your veterinarian or use our Interactive Equine Symptom Guide to help you determine what to do next.

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