What Is The Name For The Offspring Of A Male Donkey And A Female Horse? (Perfect answer)

Mule: The result of a donkey stallion mating with a female horse. Mules tend to have the head of a donkey and the extremities of a horse.

  • A hinny is a domestic equine hybrid that is the offspring of a male horse (a stallion) and a female donkey (a jenny). It is the reciprocal cross to the more common mule, which is the product of a male donkey (a jack) and a female horse (a mare).

What is the child of a male donkey and a female horse?

A mule is the offspring of a male donkey (jack) and a female horse (mare).

What is the offspring of a male horse and a female?

A hinny is the offspring of a male horse and a female donkey (jennet or jenny). They are rarer than mules, which are the offspring of a male donkey (jackass or jack) and a female horse. Like the mule, the hinny is almost always sterile.

What is the baby of a horse and a donkey called?

A foal is a baby horse, donkey, mule, zebra or pony under one year old.

Can a female donkey and a male horse reproduce?

Breeding between a female horse, or mare, and a male donkey, or jack, will produce a mule. When a female donkey, also known as a jenny or jennet, and a stallion or male horse are bred, the result is a hinny.

What is a group of donkeys called?

A group of donkeys is called a drove.

Can two mules mate?

But while mules have turned out to be extremely valuable work animals, neither mules nor hinnies can mate among themselves to produce their own offspring because of their odd origins.

What is a molly mule?

Molly: A molly is a term for a female mule. Mule: A mule is the result of breeding between a male donkey and a female horse.

What is a Jenny mule?

When a female donkey, also known as a jenny or jennet, and a stallion or male horse are bred, the result is a hinny. Mules are hybrid equines with their own distinctive traits and familiar characteristics of their sires, who are donkeys, and their dams, female horses. …

What is a donkey a mix of?

Donkeys are descended from the African wild ass. They were likely first bred around 5,000 years ago in Egypt or Mesopotamia. A mule, on the other hand, is a hybrid animal. A male horse and a female donkey (a “jenny” or “jennet”) produce a “hinny.” A hinny is just slightly smaller than a mule but otherwise similar.

Why is a donkey called a jackass?

A jackass is just a male donkey. This derives from the male donkey’s nickname “jack” paired with the original donkey terminology “ass.” Female donkeys are called “jennies” or “jennets,” but a female ready to breed is known as a “broodmare.”

Why is female donkey called Jenny?

Jenny is most commonly associated with female donkeys, but jenny has historically been used as a term for other female animals, particularly birds, especially wrens. Jenny was once used as a short way of saying spinning jenny, a spinning machine that allowed multiple threads to be spun at once, rather than just one.

What is a fixed male donkey called?

A gelding is a castrated male horse or other equine, such as a pony, donkey or a mule.

Is a colt a male or female horse?

A colt is a male horse, usually below the age of four years.

What is a male horse called?

…male horse is called a stallion, the female a mare. A stallion used for breeding is known as a stud. A castrated stallion is commonly called a gelding. Formerly, stallions were employed as riding horses, while mares were kept for breeding purposes only.

Hinny – Wikipedia

Hinny
Conservation status
Domesticated
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Perissodactyla
Family: Equidae
Tribe: Equini
Genus: Equus
Species: E. caballus♂×E. asinus♀
Synonyms
Equus mulus

It is a domesticated equine hybrid that is the child of a malehorse (astallion) and a femaledonkey (donkey) (a jenny). It is a reciprocal cross to the more commonmule, which is the offspring of a male donkey (called a jack) and a female horse (called a mare) (amare). As a result of genetic imprinting, the hinny differs from the mule in terms of both physiology and behavior.

Description

Mules are the more prevalent cross, and hinnies are the opposite of mules. In comparison to the average mule, the average hinny is smaller in height, has shorter ears, stronger legs, and a thicker mane. Genomic imprinting, which is a component of epigenetic inheritance, is responsible for some of the differences between the hinny and the mule’s appearance. The smaller womb of the female donkey (dam) compared to the bigger womb of the female horse (dam) is cited as a physiological explanation for the difference in stature between the hinny and the mule (mare).

This distinction appears to be entirely physiological, according to the American Donkey and Mule Society (ADMS), which claims that “the genetic inheritance of the hinny is precisely the same as that of the mule.” Whatever the case, the hinny’s epigenetic inheritance differs from that of the mule, as “the differences between the mule and the hinny are now known to be caused by genomic imprinting, in which the expression of a gene is determined by its origin rather than its DNA sequence,” according to the authors.

  • Hinnies, like mules, exhibit a wide range of physical characteristics.
  • As a result, the size of a hinny is confined to that of the largest breed of donkey.
  • The distinctions in physical characteristics between hinnies and mules are not limited to stature.
  • Aside from physical differences, hinnies and mules have quite different temperaments, despite the fact that they share nuclear DNA.
  • A male hinny is properly referred to as ahorse hinny, and a female hinny is technically referred to as anamare hinny, albeit in British English, both female hinnies and female donkeys are commonly referred to asjennets (short for Jenny).

Fertility, sterility and rarity

Hinnies are difficult to come by due to the disparity in the number of chromosomes between the horse and the donkey. A donkey possesses 62 chromosomes, but a horse possesses 64 chromosomes. Hinnies, which are crossbreds of the two species, contain 63 chromosomes and are virtually all sterile, despite their hybrid status. The unequal distribution of chromosomes leads in an insufficiently functional reproductive system. In accordance with the ADMS: “In order to produce an equine hybrid, it is preferable for the male to have the donkey chromosomal count, which is lower than that of the female.

  1. Many of the sperm in the emission are non-motile, while others are motile but do not produce any sperm.
  2. Female hinnies and mules are not routinely spayed, and they may or may not go into estrus during their lives.
  3. The mating of female mules with horses or donkeys has been observed on rare instances to result in the birth of offspring, albeit this is highly unusual.
  4. In China, for example, in 1981, a mule mare was found to be viable when bred to a donkey sire.
  5. In 2002, a mule mare who had been mated to a donkey sire gave birth to a male offspring in Morocco.
  6. Donkey jennies and horse stallions have the ability to be more selective in their mate selection than horse mares and donkey jacks.
  7. In spite of the fact that they are more willing to cooperate, donkey jennies are less likely to get pregnant when crossbred with a stallion than horse mares are when crossed with a donkey jack.
  8. Mammoth donkey stock is becoming more scarce, and the species has been listed as an endangered domestic breed by the United Nations.

When Mammoth jennies are in great demand to produce viable purebred Mammoth foals, it is doubtful that fanciers will commit important breeding time to developing sterile hinny hybrids. Instead, they will dedicate their valuable breeding time to producing fertile purebred Mammoth foals.

See also

  • Caballo de Messara
  • Caballo de Messara
  • It is also a term of affection inNorth East England, and is comparable to the word honey
  • SeeGeordieandMackem for further information.

References

  1. Hunter, Philip abHunter (2007). “Genes are deafeningly quiet. Is genomic imprinting the software of evolution, or is it merely a battleground for inter-generational struggle between men and women? “. PMID17471258
  2. Abcd”Longear Lingo”.lovelongears.com
  3. EMBO Reports.8(5): 441–443.doi: 10.1038/sj.embor.7400965.PMC1866201.PMID17471258
  4. The American Donkey and Mule Society held a meeting on May 22, 2013. Retrieved2014-07-16
  5. s^ Wang, Xu
  6. Miller, Donald C
  7. Harman, Rebecca
  8. Antczak, Douglas F
  9. Clark, Andrew G. Wang, Xu
  10. Clark, Andrew G. (2013). “The placenta is dominated by genes that are expressed by the father.” Proc. of the National Academy of Sciences 110(26): 10705–10710. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The Bibcode for this article is 2013PNAS11010705W.doi:10.1073/pnas.1308998110.PMC3696791.PMID23754418
  11. AbZong, E
  12. Fan, G (June 1989). A study of the variation of sterility and slow transition to fertility in hybrids of the horse and donkey was conducted. The journal Heredity, volume 62, number 3, pages 393–406, doi:10.1038/hdy.1989.54.PMID2753743.S2CID25057091
  13. AbKay, Katty (2002-10-02). “Morocco’s miracle mule,” as the saying goes. According to the BBC News. Retrieved2009-02-05
  14. s^ The names Rong, Ruizhang, Cai, Hued, Yang, Xiuqin, and Wei, Jun are derived from the Chinese characters for “rainbow” (October 1985). “A fertile mule in China and her odd foal” is the title of this article. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.78(10): 821–25.doi: 10.1177/014107688507801006.PMC1289946.PMID4045884
  15. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.78(10): 821–25.doi: 10.1177/014107688507801006.

Further reading

  • Editors: McKinnon, Angus O, Edward L Squires, Wendy E Vaala, and others. McKinnon, Angus O, Edward L Squires, Wendy E Vaala, and others (2011). Equine Reproduction is a term that refers to the reproduction of horses (2nd ed.). ISBN: 978-0-4709-6187-2
  • John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

External links

  • Why Not Hinnies
  • The American Donkey and Mule Society

What Is the Name for the Offspring of a Male Donkey and a Female Horse?

Donkey-horse hybrids are rather frequent among domesticated animals, especially donkeys. Despite this, there are some slight distinctions between hybrids that are mostly determined by their parents’ genetics. The kids produced by crossbreeding a horse and a donkey can be given a variety of names based on the species of their mother and father. Let’s have a look at what the children of a male donkey and a female horse are referred to as.

Types of Equine Hybrids

The equine (horse family) is a subfamily of the Equidae animal family, which includes horses and mules. Horses, ponies, donkeys, zebras, and hybrid species such as mules and hinnies are all examples of equines, as are other types of horses (asses). Hybrids are creatures whose parents are descended from two or more distinct species. A crucial prerequisite for interbreeding is that the species in question be sufficiently similar to be compatible with one another. With another way of saying this, you can’t match two things that are too dissimilar, such as a horse and a fish.

Crossbreeding of this nature nearly often occurs as a result of human interference.

Crossbreeding Process

A donkey and a horse are the finest options for creating a hybrid equine when trying to breed them together. This type of breeding has the potential to produce two different results. When a female donkey (jennet, jenny) and a male horse (stallion) are bred together, the resultant child is referred to as a hinny. A mule is the animal produced by mating a male donkey (jack) with a female horse (mare), and it is the consequence of this mating. Male mules are referred to as horse mules, john mules, or jack mules, whilst female mules are referred to as mare mules or molly mules, depending on their gender.

A colt is the name given to a young male mule, whereas a filly is the name given to a young female mule.

A mule is a hybrid species, descended from a donkey father (sire) and a horse mother (dam).

Mules’ Reproduction

The majority of hybrid animals are sterile, which means they are unable to reproduce. That is frequently the result of various animals having a varying number of chromosomes. When you look at the biology of horses and donkeys, you can see that the horse has 64 chromosomes and the donkey only has 62, which is a significant difference. Their interbreeding produces a mule with 63 chromosomes as a result of their interbreeding. Because of the unequal number, they are unable to couple appropriately, resulting in the infertility of the hybrid animal.

There have only been a few documented cases in which a mare mule was matched with a purebred horse or donkey and gave birth to mules, and these are rare. That type of reproduction, on the other hand, is only occasional.

Mule’s Characteristics

Mules exhibit traits of both donkeys and horses due to the fact that their parents come from two distinct species. They often inherit all of the positive characteristics of both parents and only a few of the negative characteristics.

Mule’s physical appearance

Mule kids, like many animal offspring, resemble their mothers in terms of morphological characteristics. Taking a glance at their bodies’ proportions, notably the curvature of their necks and rumps, you can notice this most clearly.

Body shape and structure

Horses are always larger than donkeys, and this means that horse females have larger wombs than donkey females. A mule may grow more than twice as fast as an ordinary donkey when raised by a horse mother. Mules’ teeth and coats are similar to those of horses, however their backs are flatter than those of horses. Mules are distinguished by their small, heavy heads and short manes. They have ears that are longer than those of a horse, but they are still shorter than those of their donkey mothers and fathers.

The features they have in common with their donkey ancestors are as follows:

Size and color

Mules seldom inherit coat colors like as white, pinto (with spots), or palomino (yellowish). Their most popular hues are as follows: When it comes to weight, mules range in size from 200 pounds (91 kg) to more than 1,000 pounds (454 kg). Horses can range in size from miniature to large, with some standing just 35 inches (91 cm) tall while others can stand up to 68 inches (172 cm) tall from the ground to the top of their heads. As you can see, mules can be as little and pudgy as ponies or as massive and powerful as draft horses, depending on their breed.

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Because there are so many variants among these hybrids, you shouldn’t rely on this description as a rigid guideline.

These characteristics are mostly determined by the gene combinations of their parents.

Mule’s behavior

You have undoubtedly heard people claim donkeys are obstinate and not that clever. In actuality, these creatures are quite intelligent and exhibit excellent common sense. Their obstinacy stems from a strong drive to protect themselves, and this trait keeps them safe. These are the qualities that a donkey father instills in his offspring when they become mules. Once the mule is confronted with danger, its behavior might become erratic. In the event that something shocks this animal, it will either flee or freeze in one spot.

When anything terrifies the horse, it will flee as a result of its flight response.

A donkey, on the other hand, will refuse to proceed if anything frightening is in its way, according to the freeze reflex that it possesses. The way each mule responds in such situations depends not on the features it has received from its parents but more on the mule’s individual personality.

Attitude towards humans

Donkeys may be a pleasure to deal with since they are friendly and seem to have an almost natural connection to humans. Horses, on the other hand, are faithful and obedient only when they have been properly taught. Mules are treated in the same way. Mushrooms will trust you and heed to your instructions if you show them patience and love. If, on the other hand, you try to push your way into anything, the mule will not be a very good partner.

Hybrid vigor

The fundamental goal of crossbreeding and creating hybrid creatures is to combine the best characteristics of both parent species in one creature. During the crossbreeding process, the objective is to eliminate their undesirable characteristics and weaknesses while passing on their favorable and desirable characteristics. That is referred to as hybrid vigor. Mules are arguably the finest illustration of the vigor that may be achieved through hybridization. They have exceptional endurance, strength, and intellect, as well as a strong need for self-preservation, which has been handed down from their donkey sires.

This means that mules are less prone than horses and donkeys to get illnesses or parasites that are common in those animals.

The mule inherited from its horse forebears the tremendous speed and athletic qualities, as well as a beautiful body structure, that the horse possessed.

Mules Usage

Because mules have a combination of the best traits of both horses and donkeys, they are valuable to people. Furthermore, because of their hybrid vigor, they are more durable than their purebred parents. Mules, for example, have the ability to jump extremely high from a standing start, even over their own height. Their intellect and obedience are always passed on to them, so they readily accept training and pick up new skills rapidly. On addition, they are comfortable in the saddle. A mule’s footing is exceptional, and they can travel long distances on tough and uneven terrain with far less effort than a horse.

  1. The carrying capacity of mules is likewise rather substantial.
  2. In addition, these species are typically not bothered by extreme temperatures, if at all.
  3. Another big advantage of using mules instead of horses for transportation is the lower cost.
  4. Therefore, they can not only transport more items or equipment because their meal takes up less room, but they can also do so at a lower cost.

Having such characteristic was critical during World War II. Mules, as opposed to horses, were more dependable for delivering ammunition and supplies in regions affected by the conflict since they did not bolt when a loud disturbance was made.

Advantages of Mules in Modern Times

The versatility of mules allows them to convey a wide range of goods, equipment, and people. Mules are great draft animals. The fact that they can travel to locations where motor vehicles cannot is useful even in the modern world since they can access areas where motor vehicles cannot. Mules are useful for those who need to go across rugged mountain terrain, canyons, or unstable terrain, among other things.

Summary

When two animal species are sufficiently similar, such as horses and donkeys, it is possible to crossbreed them and produce hybrid creatures that combine the best characteristics of both parents. When male donkeys and female horses are bred together, mules are produced, which are extraordinarily robust and important in everyday life.

How to Tell the Difference Between a Mule & Hinny

Photographs courtesy of IJupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images Mules and hinnies differ in a variety of ways, yet they are both categorized as mules among the general public and in the show ring. It is only possible to generate a mule or hinny by crossing a horse with a donkey. This kind of hybrid equines is tough and clever, and they have a longer working life, stronger hooves, and better endurance than horses. Mules and hinnies have a higher illness resistance and tend to live longer lives than their mothers and fathers.

Parentage

It is not the same as the parentage of a mule and that of a hinny. A mule is produced by crossing a female horse, or mare, with a male donkey, or jack, in a breeding program. Hindernies are produced when a female donkey, also known as a jennet, and a male horse, also known as a stallion or male horse, are bred together. Mules are crossbred equines with their own distinct characteristics and characteristics that are familiar to their sires, who are donkeys, and their dams, who are female horses.

Hinnies are also hybrids; however, although some resemble their horse moms, most like their donkey dads, despite the fact that some resemble both.

Appearance

Mules are supposed to have the body of a horse with the extremities of a donkey, whilst hinnies are said to have the body of a donkey with the extremities of a horse. Mules and donkeys are both related to horses. Hinnies are often smaller than mules due to the fact that a donkey mare is smaller than the majority of horses. The ears of a hinny are shorter than those of a mule, and his mane and tail are thicker and longer, as well as his hooves being larger. More so than mules, hinnies differ from one another in that they can range from being very identical to a horse to being mule-like or nearly indistinguishable from a donkey in appearance.

The tail of a mule can be significantly larger and longer than that of a donkey. Her legs are straight, just like the donkey’s, and her hooves are tiny, firm, and straight-sided, just like the donkey’s.

Hybrid Vigor

Mules are endowed with hybrid vigor. They are often stronger than horses and have far longer lives than horses, which allows them to labor for much longer periods of time. They are not prone to illness or lameness, and they are tolerant of extremes in temperature. Mules are able to survive on a little amount of food, have tremendous stamina, are tough, and are sure-footed. The American hinnies are considered to be deficient in hybrid vigor, and it has long been noted that they are smaller than mules (although this may be partially due to the fact that they are carried in a smaller womb), less powerful, and possessing less stamina and toughness than mules.

Intelligence and Temperament

Mules outperform horses in terms of intelligence, perception, and sensitivity. They are fast to pick up new information and are skilled at analyzing circumstances. “Obliging, kind, patient, persevering, calm, tolerant, sensible, loyal, affectionate and playful,” according to the British Mule Society, are the characteristics of mules who have smart and respectful handlers and trainers. “Obliging” mules are also “proud”, “jealous” and “calculating,” according to the British Mule Society. Hinnies have a more donkey-like demeanor, which is partly due to the fact that they are reared by donkeys.

They are also more autonomous and adventurous than mules.

Companion Choice

It is possible that visible differences between mules and hinnies are small, and that these differences are not constant enough to distinguish one hybrid from the other. Behavioral methods are one type of approach that may be more trustworthy than others. If you release a mule or hinny into a herd of horses, the mule will almost always prefer horses as her companions, as she was reared by a horse mother during her life. Because his mother is a donkey, the hinny will be more likely to choose to interact with the donkeys than with the horses.

Wolf has been a certified psychotherapist since 2000, and she works with clients who are dealing with depression, anxiety, body image, parenthood, aging, and LGBTQ concerns.

Mule

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In its most popular modern definition, amule is the child of a male donkey and a female horse, and it is classed as a kind of F1 hybrid in the scientific community. Ahinny is the name given to the child of a male horse and a female donkey, who are the polar opposites of the above. Historically, the term “mule” (Latinmulus) was used to refer to the sterile offspring of any two creatures belonging to separate species, regardless of their origin. The mule, which is simpler to produce and is often greater in size than a hinny, has captured the imagination of breeders everywhere.

It’s not uncommon for folks to let a stallion (male horse) to run with a jenny (female donkey) for as long as six years before the donkey conceives.

The difference in the number of chromosomes between the two species is thought to be the cause of the sterility: donkeys have 62 chromosomes, whereas horses have 64.

Mollies are female mules that have gone through their estrus cycle and are capable of carrying a child. Mollies can arise spontaneously or through embryo transfer in rare cases. The most difficult part is getting the molly pregnant in the first place, which is extremely tough.

Additional recommended knowledge

  • Mules of a different hue
  • 7See also
  • 8References
  • 3Fertile mules 4The contemporary mule 5The mule clone 6Mules of a different color

Biology

In terms of weight, a mule typically weighs between 270 kg (600 lb) and 410 kg (800 lb) (900 lb).

Characteristics

The mule resembles a donkey in appearance due to its short thick head, long ears, thin limbs, small narrow hooves, short mane, absence ofchestnuts (horny growths) inside the hocks, and tail hairless at the root; however, the mule resembles a horse in height and body, shape of neck andcroup, uniformity of coat, and teeth; the mule comes in a variety of sizes, shapes, and variations Horse-like mules, enormous draft mules, fine-boned racing mules, shaggy pony mules, and a variety of other breeds are available.

  1. A mule does not have a distinct sound that is similar to that of a donkey or a horse.
  2. Mules whimper from time to time.
  3. Sorrel, bay, black, and grey are some of the most popular hues.
  4. Paint mules and Tobianos are the least prevalent breeds.
  5. Mules are often preferred over horses by working animal operators because they are less impatient under the pressure of big loads, and since their skin is stronger and less sensitive than that of horses, they are better able to withstand the effects of the sun and rain.
  6. Several North American farmers who worked on clay soil, particularly in the state of Missouri in the United States, discovered that mules were outstanding plow animals.
  7. They are also capable of striking out with any of their hooves in any direction at any point in their journey.

Distribution

According to the FAO, China was the most important market for mules in 2003, closely followed by Mexico and a number of Central and South American countries as well.

Fertile mules

The mating of female mules with purebred horses or donkeys has resulted in the birth of many progeny. Worldwide, there have been more than 60 reported examples of foals being born to female mules since 1527, with the majority occurring in the United States. It should be emphasized that there have been no documented occurrences of fertile mule stallions in existence. Mules and hinnies contain 63 chromosomes, which are a combination of one chromosome from each parent and one from the other. The fact that the chromosomes have a varied shape and quantity frequently hinders them from joining up properly and resulting in a viable embryo.

The following are some examples of documented fertile mules:

  • Cornevin and Lesbre reported that an Arab mule in Africa was mated to a stallion in 1873, and the result was a litter of female offspring. The parents and children were taken to the Jardin d’Acclimatation in Paris for acclimatization. In addition to her first female progeny, the mule produced two male offspring, one sired by a donkey and the other by a stallion, both of whom were born to the same stallion. Despite the fact that the female mules were fertile, their kids were weak and perished shortly after birth
  • Cossar Ewart documented an Indian example in which a female mule gave birth to a male colt. During the 1920s, “Old Beck,” a mule mare at Texas A&M University, had a mule daughter named “Kit,” which was the first reported fertile mule mare. “Krause” was the first documented fertile mule mare, and she produced two male offspring when mated back to her own sire (biological father). The horse son of Old Beck was produced after she had been mated to a horse stallion (i.e., the horse stallion sired horse foals). In Morocco, when bred to a donkey, she produced a male foal that was 75 percent donkey and 25 percent horse, indicating that she passed on a mixture of genes rather than passing on her maternal chromosomes in the expected way
  • And there is an unverified case of a mare mule that produced a mule daughter. The daughter was likewise fertile, and she gave birth to a foal that looked like a horse but had some mule characteristics
  • This was named a “hule.” No information has been provided as to whether or not the mule was fertile
  • Nevertheless, a similar example in China involves a fertile hinny (donkey mother, horse sire, the polar opposite of a mule). Her baby, dubbed “Dragon Foal,” was sired by a donkey, who was also named Dragon. If the mother had passed on her maternal chromosomes in the same way as a mule does, scientists predicted the birth of a donkey foal. Dragon Foal, on the other hand, resembles a bizarre donkey with mule-like characteristics. A genetic analysis of her chromosomes and DNA testing indicate that she is a previously unreported mix.
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The modern mule

A female foal was generated by a cross between an Arab mule and a stallion in Africa in 1873, according to Cornevin and Lesbre. They were taken to the Jardin d’Acclimatation in Paris, where they remained for many weeks. The mule gave birth to a second female offspring who was sired by the same stallion, as well as two male offspring, one of whom was sired by a donkey and the other by a stallion, after that. Despite the fact that the female descendants were fertile, their kids were weak and perished at delivery; Cossar Ewart wrote of an Indian case in which a female mule delivered a male colt.

“Krause” produced two male children when mated back to her own sire (biological father).

She produced mule offspring when she was bred with a donkey; a mare mule in Brazil has produced two 100 percent horse sons who were sired by a horse stallion; in Morocco, a mare mule produced a male foal who was 75 percent donkey and 25 percent horse, which indicates that she passed on a mixture of genes rather than passing on her maternal chromosomes in the expected way; and there is an unconfirmed case of a It was discovered that the daughter was also fertile, and she gave birth to a foal that was similar to a horse but also had some characteristics of a mule; this foal was known as a “hule.” In China, a fertile hinny (donkey mother, horse sire) was said to have given birth to a litter of calves.

There is no information on whether the mule was pregnant.

In contrast, Dragon Foal is a bizarre donkey with mule-like traits that seems like it belongs in the wild.

The mule clone

Researchers at the University of Idaho and Utah State University ultimately discovered a means to induce mules to breed in 2003, when they cloned the world’s first mule as part of the Project Idaho initiative. Gordon Woods, University of Iowa professor of animal and veterinary science, Kenneth L. White, University of Utah professor of animal science, and Dirk Vanderwall, University of Iowa associate professor of animal and veterinary science, are members of the study team. Idaho Gem, the newborn mule, was born on May 4th.

When the foal and its surrogate mother were examined by veterinarians shortly after delivery, they were found to be in good health. The foal’s DNA was derived from a fetal cell culture that was initially established in 1998 at the University of Idaho, according to the university.

Mules of a different color

Mules are available in a variety of sizes, styles, and colors today, ranging from minis weighing less than 50 pounds to maxis weighing more than 1000 pounds, and in a variety of colors. Mules bred with appaloosa mares produce wildly colored mules that are similar in appearance to their appaloosa horse ancestors, but with even more radically distorted color patterns and patterns. The appaloosa color is created by a group of genes known as the Leopard Complex, which works together to produce the hue (Lp).

See also

  • Afro-Asian Wild Ass
  • Donkey
  • Horse
  • Jennet
  • Kiang: Hinny
  • Onager

References

  1. ^”Mule”. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General KnowledgeXVII. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General Knowledge (1888). Henry G. Allen and Company is number fifteen. 2007-12-26
  2. Retrieved on 2007-12-26
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Breeds and types List of horse breeds
Hybrids MuleHinnyZeedonkZonyZorseZebroid
Extinct Species European AssSyrian Wild AssQuaggaTarpanYukon Wild Ass

What is the offspring of a male horse and a female donkey called?

Hennies are domesticated horses that are crossbred with donkeys. A hinny is the result of the crossbreeding of male horses (stallions) and female donkeys (jennies). Essentially, it is the inverse of the more familiar mule, which is the offspring of a male donkey, referred to as a jack, crossing with a female horse, known as a mare. A result of genomic imprinting, the hinny differs from the mule in terms of physiology and temperament as well as appearance. Horses and donkeys have a different number of chromosomes than humans, making it impossible to breed them together to produce hinnies.

As a result of their hybridization with those two species, hinnies have 63 chromosomes and are, in the vast majority of cases, infertile.

In accordance with the ADMS: “In order to produce an equine hybrid, it is preferable for the male to have the donkey chromosomal count, which is lower than that of the female.

It is common practice to castrate male hinnies and mules, in order to better manage their behavior by removing their sexual attraction in females.

Of Jacks and Jennets: Facts About Donkeys (Published 2016)

There are around 44 million donkeys in the globe. They descended from the African wild ass, which is now severely endangered in its natural habitat. In Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Somalia, there may be as few as 600 people. Donkeys have been known to live into their forties. Female donkeys are referred to as jennets, while male donkeys are referred to as jacks. ■ Donkeys have 62 chromosomes while horses have 64 chromosomes, however they may interbreed with one another. Similarly, a mule is the offspring of a male donkey and a female horse, and a hinny is the offspring of a male horse and a female donkey, respectively.

  • Mules are bred far more frequently than hinnies because male donkey/female horse pairings are about as successful as horses breeding with horses, with a success rate of about 65 percent.
  • The rate of male horse/female donkey couplings is far lower, however experts admit that it is difficult to quantify.
  • Image C.K.
  • ■ Wild donkeys are commonly referred to as burros in the United States, which is the Spanish term for donkey.
  • In the United States, the phrase “ass” is met with laughter.
  • The term “ass” is used to refer to a donkey or a stupid.
  • In the Old English language, arse is derived from the word “aers,” which is connected to Dutch and German terms.

The animal takes its breath in on the hee and exhales it on the haw.

Understanding Genetics

-A Michigan middle school student who is in the third grade The 20th of June, 2007 You are correct in stating that a horse and a donkey may produce children. A hinny can be found on both a male horse and a female donkey. A mule is the offspring of a female horse and a male donkey. However, hinnies and mules are unable to conceive children of their own. They are sterile because they are incapable of producing sperm or eggs. It is difficult for them to produce sperm or eggs because their chromosomes do not line up properly.

  • In order to produce a mule, the mother gives her 32 horse chromosomes and the father gives her 31 donkey chromosomes for a total of 63 chromosomes.
  • And in order to comprehend this, we must first go through the concept of chromosomes in greater depth.
  • This means that we have two copies of chromosome 1, two copies of chromosome 2, and so on and so forth.
  • From its mother, the mule inherited a pair of horse chromosomes.
  • These chromosomes are not paired in the same way as they are in a horse, a donkey, or a person.
  • It has a similar appearance and has approximately the same set of A’s, G’s, T’s, and C’s as the previous version.
  • A donkey chromosome, on the other hand, does not always look like a horse chromosome.

Cells must undergo a process known as meiosis in order to produce a sperm or an egg.

As an illustration, let us consider chromosome 1.

At the completion of meiosis, the sperm or egg will have either the mother’s or father’s chromosome 1 attached to it.

This procedure necessitates the use of two items.

This will have to do with how well they match up during meiosis, which will be discussed later.

With a mule, neither of these things can happen entirely.

First and first, all of the chromosomes duplicate themselves, which is known as meiotic replication.

This is something that a mule cell is perfectly capable of.

It is the following step that is the source of the true difficulty.

As a result, the four chromosome 1s must all be aligned in the same direction.

As previously stated, the chromosomes of a donkey and a horse are not necessarily identical enough to line up.

The chromosomes are unable to identify their mates, resulting in the failure to produce sperm and eggs in the body.

But how on earth is the obnoxious creature still alive?

First and foremost, having an odd number of chromosomes has little significance in everyday life.

This is significant when you consider that a mule went from having one cell to having billions of them!

Regular cells (also known as somatic cells) go through a process known as mitosis.

All of the chromosomes replicate themselves in the same way.

As a result, for the mule, each cell has a total of 63 chromosomes.

In addition, our lone horse chromosome is in good health.

This appears to be self-explanatory at first glance, except that having excess DNA frequently results in serious consequences.

A kid can, on the other hand, live if he or she has an extra chromosome.

When you have an additional copy of chromosome 21, you get all of the extra genes, which causes the symptoms associated with Down syndrome.

However, the mule appears to be in good health.

In other words, the additional genes on the horse chromosome do not interfere with the mule’s ability to do its normal daily activities.

As a result, mules are infertile because the chromosomes of horses and donkeys are simply too dissimilar. However, they are still alive because the chromosomes of horses and donkeys are close enough to allow them to mate. Monica Rodriguez is a woman who lives in the United States.

Ever wonder why mules can’t reproduce? Here’s the explanation

Q: I understand the conclusion of this issue, but I’m not sure about the biology behind it: Why can’t two mules make baby mules? What is the purpose of using a horse in this process? Is it an issue with the males or with the females, or are there no female mules available for purchase? Horses receive a great deal of attention, yet we could never have conquered the West if it weren’t for mules. Scott Townsend, a resident of Marissa, A: There are no guarantees in life, Scott, and mules, like the majority of individuals who hope to win a large lottery sum, are condemned to fail in their attempts at reproducing themselves.

  1. Because of a fluke of nature, mules have appeared in the wild.
  2. When it comes to giraffes and elephants, we aren’t known for being careless.
  3. Most of the time, it is the male donkey (jack) that mates with the female horse (mare) to create a mule, which can be either male or female.
  4. However, despite the fact that mules have proven to be exceptionally important labor animals, neither mules nor hinnies are able to reproduce among themselves as a result of their unusual origins.
  5. After a pair of human eggs and sperm mate, you are born with 23 chromosomes from each parent.
  6. 1 aligns with your mother’s No.
  7. 2 aligns with your father’s No.

Due to the fact that each pair is essentially similar, when egg and sperm unite, the pairs normally mix seamlessly to produce another healthy infant who will ultimately be able to pass on the species’ genetic line.

Horses, on the other hand, have 32 pairs of chromosomes, but a donkey only has 31 pairs.

See also:  What Is A Gelding Horse? (TOP 5 Tips)

If you’re familiar with genetics, you’re probably aware that some individuals are born with an extra copy of chromosome 21, which is a rare occurrence.

Miscarriages in humans can be caused by additional chromosomes of other types.

However, having an extra chromosome is not the only issue.

Without going into the technical details of how sex cells are produced (by a process known as meiosis), let’s put it in plain English: Mules and hinnies are only seldom able to create the cells necessary for reproduction because the chromosomes of horses and donkeys are so distinct to each other’s.

So, how is it possible for such animals to exist in the first place?

Her comments on the animals, which are often more patient and live longer lives than horses while being less stubborn and more clever than donkeys, were based on the fact that “a mule’s cells can divide and generate new cells just well.” “The cells of a mule are perfectly capable of dividing and producing new cells.

Instead of matching up, they just sort into two new cells, creating a new row.

Nothing on the additional or missing chromosome causes any harm to the individual.” Nevertheless, when these differences are paired with the differences between horse and donkey chromosomes, the overall result is frequently — but not always — infertile progeny.

The ancient Greek historian Herodotus noted that the birth of an animal was an omen for the invasion of Greece by Xerxes in 480 B.C., writing, “There happened also a portent of another type while he was still at Sardis – a mule came out young and gave birth to a mule.” As well as this, in 2002, the BBC broadcast an article on how a 14-year-old mother mule in Morocco stunned everyone by giving birth.

According to the story, “the mule’s elderly owner was unaware that the mule was pregnant and rode her to market (12 miles) the day before the delivery.” Soon, throngs of people descended on the woman’s farm to shower her with presents in celebration of the miracle.

The BBC reported that just 60 occurrences of mules giving birth were documented between 1527 and 2002, a period of approximately 500 years.

According to the American Donkey and Mule Society, only one hinny mare has ever been known to give birth, and that was in China in 1981, according to their records. When it comes to producing offspring, male mules and hinnies, on the other hand, appear to be completely ineffective.

Today’s trivia

Who made their first public appearance at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair, and where did they go from there? The answer to Sunday’s trivia question is: Cahokia Mounds, located near Collinsville, is renowned for its Monks Mound, which is the biggest man-made earthen mound in North America and the largest in the world. However, if you traveled to Effigy Mounds National Monument, which is located near Harpers Ferry, Iowa, you would discover mounds of dirt shaped like birds, bears, deer, bison, lynx, turtles, and panthers, among other animals.

The effigy-mound culture may be found from Dubuque, Iowa, north into southeast Minnesota, to southern Wisconsin, and all the way to the mouth of the Mississippi River.

Mule – New World Encyclopedia

Amule is the child of a maledonkey (Equus asinus) and a femalehorse (Equus caballus), both of which are large ungulate (hoofed) mammals belonging to the horse family. Amule’s parents are both large ungulate (hoofed) mammals belonging to the horse family (Equidae). A hinny is the child of a male horse and a female donkey, and it is the polar opposite of a hinny. Mules and hinnies are normally infertile animals, however this is not always the case. Historically, the term “mule” (Latinmulus) was also used to refer to the child of any two creatures of different species – in current usage, this is referred to as a “hybrid.” It is still employed for sterile hybrids between various species of birds or between different kinds of plants, for example, between an acanary and other birds.

  • Human people, in their role as stewards of creation, have generated numerous distinct breeds of animals and types of plants as a result of their ingenuity.
  • Mules exist, and in such large numbers, solely as a result of the ingenuity and ingenuity of human people.
  • These creatures are renowned for their endurance, surefootedness, and willingness to put in long hours.
  • During the settling of the United States, the cutting of trees for fields and roads, as well as the transportation of wagons and loads of supplies, they played an important role.

They were employed to transport goods during World Wars I and II. They performed admirably when working with novice employees and in scorching heat. In various parts of the world, mules are still utilized in place of motorized machinery, even in modern times.

Overview

A mule is a cross between a male donkey and a female horse that has resulted through breeding. Equus asinus, often known as the donkey or ass, is a member of the horse family,Equidae, and the orderPerissodactyla, which includes odd-toed ungulates (hoofedmammals). The term “donkey” refers to the domesticatedE. asinus, whereas the term “ass” refers to the wild progenitor of the domesticatedE. asinus, also known as the African wild ass. The horse, sometimes known as the domestic horse (Equus caballus), is a member of the genus Equus.

  1. While distinct species of the horse family can interbreed, the progeny, such as the mule, are virtually always infertile.
  2. The Przewalski’s Horse (Equus ferus Przewalski) and the domestic horse are the only two equids that may cross-breed and produce viable progeny.
  3. Mules are often greater in size than hinnies (which are crossbred horses and donkeys), and they have captured the attention of many breeders due to their huge stature.
  4. It’s not uncommon for folks to let a stallion (male horse) to run with a jenny (female donkey) for as long as six years before the donkey conceives.
  5. The difference in the number of chromosomes between the two species is thought to be the cause of the sterility: donkeys have 62 chromosomes, whereas horses have 64.
  6. Soon after the domesticated horse was introduced to the Middle East, approximately 1500 B.C.E., donkeys and horses began to be mixed together, resulting in the birth of mules, who were later tamed.

“The mule is a fantastic example of hybrid vigour,” notes domestic animal specialist Juliet Clutton-Brook (1999), “since it has greater stamina and endurance than either the ass or the horse, and it can carry bigger burdens with greater assurance.” According to the FAO, China was the most important market for mules in 2003, followed by Mexico and a number of Central and South American countries.

Characteristics

Mules have features that are similar to both donkeys and horses. When it comes to its short and large head, long ears, weak limbs, tiny narrow hooves, and short mane, the mule is similar to a donkey due to the absence of chestnuts (horny growths) inside the hip joints and the absence of fur on its tail at the root. Mules resemble horses in their height and physique, as well as in their neck and croup (rump), uniformity of coat, and number of teeth. Although it sounds like a donkey or a horse, it is not quite so.

  • Mules will whimper from time to time as well.
  • Mules, on the other hand, are frequently Bay or Sorrel in color, depending on the type of jack (sire) utilized.
  • White, Roans (both blue and red), Palomino, Dun, and Buckskin are among the less frequent breeds.
  • The mule is thought to have the endurance, patience, and sure-footedness of a donkey, as well as the energy, power, and courage of a horse, according to traditional beliefs.
  • There is a natural resilience to illness and insects in their hooves, which makes them a better choice for grazing.

When it came to plowing clay soil, many North American farmers thought mules to be better plow animals. Their popularity with farmers and settlers in the United States state of Missouri gave rise to the nickname “Missouri mule.” The mule is now the official animal of Missouri.

Fertile mules

When married with a purebred horse or donkey, a number of female mules have given birth to kids. Worldwide, there have been more than 60 reported examples of foals being born to female mules since 1527, with the majority occurring in the United States. There have been no documented instances of fertile mule stallions. Because mules and hinnies have 63 chromosomes, but donkeys and horses have 62 and 64, respectively, the differences in the shape and quantity of chromosomes sometimes prevent the chromosomes from joining up properly and resulting in successful embryos in these animals.

The following are some examples of documented fertile mules:

  • Cornevin and Lesbre reported that an Arab mule in Africa was mated to a stallion in 1873, and the result was a litter of female offspring. The parents and children were taken to the Jardin d’Acclimatation in Paris for acclimatization. In addition to her first female progeny, the mule produced two male offspring, one sired by a donkey and the other by a stallion, both of whom were born to the same stallion. Despite the fact that the female mules were fertile, their kids were weak and perished shortly after birth
  • Cossar Ewart documented an Indian example in which a female mule gave birth to a male colt. The most well-documented fertile mule mare was “Krause,” who was mated back to her own sire (biological father) and had two male children. In the 1920s, “Old Beck,” a mare mule at Texas A M, produced a mule daughter named “Kit,” who was bred back to her own sire (biological father). The horse son of Old Beck was produced after she had been mated to a horse stallion (i.e., the horse stallion sired horse foals). Similarly, in Morocco, a mare mule produced a male foal that was 75 percent donkey and 25 percent horse (i.e., she passed on a mixture of genes rather than passing on her maternal chromosomes in the expected way)
  • In China, a fertile hinny (donkey mother, horse sire – the inverse of a mule) produced a male foal that was 75 percent donkey and 25 percent horse (i.e., she passed on Her baby, dubbed “Dragon Foal,” was sired by a donkey, who was also named Dragon. If the mother had passed on her maternal chromosomes in the same way as a mule does, scientists predicted the birth of a donkey foal. Dragon Foal, on the other hand, resembles a bizarre donkey with mule-like characteristics. A genetic analysis of her chromosomes and DNA testing indicate that she is a previously unreported mix.

The modern mule

Mules in the United States reached record lows following World War II, as the employment of mules for farming and transporting agricultural products was replaced by sophisticated tractors and trucks, which were more efficient and reliable. A small but committed group of mule breeders, on the other hand, carried on the tradition as a hobby and kept breeding the famous lines of gigantic jacks that were launched in the United States by George Washington with the gift of two Catalan Jacks from the King of Spain in 1793.

Mules competing in Western and English Pleasure riding exhibitions, as well as dressage and hunter jumper competitions, have joined the ranks of exhibition displays when mules dragged large loads.

Mules are available in a variety of sizes, styles, and colors today, ranging from minis weighing less than 50 pounds to maxis weighing more than 1000 pounds, and in a variety of colors.

The Appaloosa hue is created by a group of genes collectively referred to as the Leopard Complex (Lp).

See also

This page combines content from theEncyclopaedia Britannica Eleventh Edition, which is now in the public domain, as well as other sources.

  • Caras, R. A., et al. 1996. A Perfect Harmony: The Intertwining Lives of Animals and Humans Throughout History is a book on the intertwining lives of animals and humans throughout history. ISBN 0684811006
  • New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.
  • Clutton-Brook, J., and Clutton-Brook, J. 1999. Domesticated Mammals: A Natural History of the World’s Domesticated Mammals University Press of Cambridge, ISBN 0521634954
  • Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.
  • Trujillo, J. M., C. Stenius, L. C. Christian, and S. Ohno, 1962, Chromosomes of the Horse, the Donkey, and the Mule, Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. Chromosoma13 has 243-248 nucleotides.

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