How Much Is A Horse In Texas? (Perfect answer)

A run-of-the-mill horse (is there really such a thing?!) can run anywhere between $800 and $4K, depending on your location, the horse’s health and quality, and your personal preference. Show horses can vary between $3,500 and $8K.

How much does a horse cost to buy?

  • Most casual riders will be buying horses well below the $10,000 mark. A number of factors affect the price of horses, and several things have come into play in the last few years that have driven the initial cost of a horse down while driving the cost of keeping a horse up.

How much is a typical horse?

To buy a horse, you can expect to pay between $100 – $10,000, depending on the horse breed’s pedigree, how you are planning to use the horse, and your location. The average cost of a hobby-horse is about $3,000. According to Seriously Equestrian, the most expensive horse breeds can cost up to $250,000.

Can I own a horse in Texas?

Yes, you can have a horse in your backyard in Texas. Texas is the state with the most horses; believed that there are more than one million horses. In Texas, horse keepers are only allowed to keep one horse per acre, but in some cities like Fort Worth, every large animal requires 10,000 square feet of land.

How much do grade horses cost?

Grade horses are reasonably affordable and can cost you anything between $2,000 and $7,000 more or less. However, pricing will depend on factors like the horse’s age, size, physical limitations, conformation, and level of training.

How can I afford a horse?

How to Afford a Horse – Save Money on Horse Ownership

  1. Buy the Best Quality Hay you can Find.
  2. Reduce your boarding expenses.
  3. Check your Supplements.
  4. Buy in Bulk Whenever Possible.
  5. Provide Care and Maintenance for your Horse.
  6. Reduce your Training or Lesson Costs.
  7. Buy Used when Possible.
  8. Repair Instead of Buying New.

Is owning a horse expensive?

Horses are expensive to keep. The initial purchase price of your horse, pony, donkey, or mule is only a small part of its overall cost, and there is no such thing as a free horse. Your horse needs daily care, and that can be costly and the costs can vary due to a number of uncontrollable factors.

How much is a stallion horse?

Price Range: From about $4,000 to several million dollars. A black stallion named Totilas was sold for approximately 11 million Euros to a German trainer.

What is the cheapest horse breed?

The cheapest horse breeds on average are the Quarter horse, Mustang, Paint horse, Thoroughbred, and Standardbred. Though prices will vary depending on the horse, there are often many budget-friendly horses for sale within these breeds.

Can you have a horse on 1 acre?

(You may not need as much grazing land if they’ll be eating hay every day.) In general, professionals recommend two acres for the first horse and an additional acre for each additional horse (e.g., five acres for four horses). With excellent management, one horse can live on as little as one mud-free acre.

How much room do you need for a horse?

If you are attempting to figure the carrying capacity of land for a horse, then a good rule of thumb is 1-1/2 to 2 acres of open intensely managed land per horse. Two acres, if managed properly, should provide adequate forage in the form of pasture and/or hay ground. But this is highly variable depending on location.

How old do horses live?

The Cost of Ponies The cost of a good pony can be the same or higher than a horse. Expect prices for suitable first ponies to be about $1,000 and upwards.

How much is the most expensive horse?

Many factors go into the value of a horse and there are no rules set in stone on how much horses can sell. A thoroughbred named Fusaichi Pegasus was sold for $70 million in an auction, making him the most expensive horse ever to be sold.

What makes a horse expensive?

However, owning a horse is expensive. Factors such as the breed, age, performance level, and capability influence the horse’s price. Thus, racehorses fetch a higher price due to the potential earnings they may earn in the future. With some breeds going for millions of dollars, prices vary even within the same breed.

How Much Does it Cost to Own a Horse? Budget Well

We despise spam as much as you do, and we will never share your email information with anybody. One day, you may have envisioned yourself riding through your Texas ranch with your own horse, enjoying the great outdoors with a companion with whom you instantly bond. Alternatively, you may believe that, with Christmas approaching, it would be wonderful to witness the joy on your child’s face if you surprised them with a horse for the holidays. But were you aware of how expensive it may be to acquire a horse in the first place?

That is something that many a cowgirl or cowboy, rancher or farmer will tell you.

The fact that you’re searching for a regular equine companion to ride on your property rather than a show horse makes a significant difference in the outcome.

The cost of a show horse can range between $3,500 and $8,000.

  1. Photo:Pixabay It is possible that you may spend upwards of $2000 or more in combination with your purchase, including a routine veterinarian checkup, some basic gear, and your general stable supplies (again, depending on the horse and your options).
  2. If you don’t have a place to keep the animal, you’ll need to board it.
  3. These fees can range from $2K to $3K, depending on the size of the animals and the location where they are maintained.
  4. The expense of ownership will grow as a result of these measures, but the owner and the animal will always be on the most favorable route to a long life together.
  5. A reasonable contingency would be between $550 and $600.
  6. When it comes to personal taste, personal ownership, and personal care, the possibilities are virtually limitless.
  7. Is it really worth it?

When your kid or daughter looks at you affectionately and says, “All I want for Christmas is a horse,” you’ll have a better concept of how much money that present will cost you out of your own pocket.

Horses for sale in Texas

Texas 523 resultsBrowse our community listings of horses for sale in Texas, the Lone Star state. With over 979,000 horses in the country, Texas is a leader in the equine industry. The American Quarter Horse Association is based in Amarillo, and Fort Worth is home to the National Cutting Horse Association.

Chestnut Rabicano Arabian Mare

SubcategoryArabicGenderMareAge18 years 6 monthsHeight14.2 handsSubcategoryArabicGenderMareAge18 years 6 months ColorChestnutLocation Nacogdoches is a city in Texas. The most beautiful chestnut Rabicano with a flaxen mane and tail broodmare on the market. Good manners on the ground, but not a force to be reckoned with.

SIMBA is a 12 yr old fancy all around gelding!

Afro-AsianGenderMareAge18 years 6 monthsHeight14.2 handsSubcategoryArabianAfro-AsianGenderMareAge18 years 6 months ColorChestnutLocation City of Nacogdoches Excellent broodmare prospect, a gorgeous chestnut Rabicano with a flaxen mane and tail! Good manners on the ground, but not a force to be reckoned with in battle.

Adorable Bay Pony

SubcategoryPonyGenderGelding Age9 yearsHeight11.2 hands Age9 yearsHeight11.2 hands Weatherford, Texas is the location of ColorBay. Hanz is a 9-year-old bay ranch pony with a robust build and a strong leap. He is 11 hands and weighs 112 pounds. This pony is one of them.

Cool Buckskin Jumping Pony

SubcategoryQuarter PonyGenderGeldingSubcategoryQuarter PonyGenderGelding Age12 years and one monthHeight13.2 feet ColorBuckskinLocation Weatherford, Texas is a city in Texas. Pluto is a 12-year-old buckskin pony with a height of 13.2 hands. He is the sort who takes the initiative. He’s a sweetheart and a good friend.

Nice Welsh Pony

A subcategory of the Welsh Pony is Welsh PonyGenderMareAge6 years and 1 monthHeight12.3 hands. ClimateWeatherford, TexasColorChestnutLocation Amiga is a six-year-old pony mare with a height of 12.3 hands and a kind disposition. Excellent size and willingness to work.

Gentle Ranch Gelding

SubcategoryQuarter HorseGenderGeldingSubcategoryQuarter HorseGenderGelding 14 years old, 15 hands tall ColorSorrelLocation Weatherford, Texas is a city in Texas. Fire Ant is a 14-year-old gelding with a strong build and a height of 15 hands. He is an extremely gentle gelding with a nice temperament.

Flashy Christmas Special

SubcategoryQuarter HorseGenderMareAge3 yrs 10 mthsHeight15.3 handsColorBayLocationCopperas cove, T.Daughter of HBF Iron Man and That’s Y I’m Cool! This mare has it all and double registered.

How Much Does A Horse Cost In Texas?

In Texas, how much does it cost to own a horse? Is it legal for me to own a horse in Texas? Texas is the state with the greatest number of horses, with an estimated population of over one million horses. Horses are quite popular among Texans, and if you’re wondering if you may have horses in your backyard in this location, the answer is yes. Maintaining a horse in your backyard is possible, but only if you offer the appropriate amount of room for your horse. What do you think is a reasonable price for a horse?

The majority of pleasure riders, on the other hand, can get a good-natured, healthy trail horse for under $5,000.

A Quarter horse will typically cost between $2,500 and $10,000 on average.

The cost of a Quarter horse is determined by a variety of criteria, including age, genetics, training, and gender.

How Much Does A Horse Cost In Texas – Related Questions

Volunteer. When it comes to equine-related volunteer opportunities, the options are practically limitless.

You can volunteer at horse shows, horse rescues, therapeutic programs, barns, or even for individuals who require assistance with their horses, depending on your interests. You will get the opportunity to spend time with horses while also assisting others.

Can you own a duck in Texas?

Fowl. Animals such as chickens, turkeys, geese, and ducks are classified as fowl. There is no state legislation that governs the keeping of these species of animals. If you reside within city borders, the local rules that govern your neighborhood will determine whether or not you are permitted to have them on your property.

Can I have a horse on 1 acre?

Generally speaking, with proper care, one horse may be raised on as little as 0.4 hectares of land (one acre). At one horse on 0.8 hectares, life will be a whole lot simpler (two acres). For horse owners who are running horses together, maintaining a ratio of one horse every 0.4 acres of land would be extraordinary accomplishment (one acre).

How much is the cheapest horse?

Those wishing to acquire their first horse will most likely require a budget of between $1,500 and $3,000 to cover the cost of the horse and training. You may be able to find a gem for less than this, but having that much money will provide you with the biggest number of options available to you. The more money you have to spend, the greater the number of options you will have.

What is the cheapest horse breed?

Quarter horses, Mustangs, Paint horses, Thoroughbreds, and Standardbreds are the horse breeds that are the most affordable on average. While individual horse pricing will vary based on the breed, there are frequently numerous budget-friendly horses available for purchase among these breeds.

How much does a horse cost a month?

According to responses to a University of Maine poll on horse ownership, the average yearly cost of horse ownership is $3,876 per horse, with the median cost being $2,419 per horse. This puts the average monthly price somewhere between $200 and $325 – about on pace with a vehicle loan or mortgage payment.

Who is the most expensive horse in the world?

Fusaichi Pegasus is the most expensive horse in history, having sold for a whopping $70 million (£53.7 million) to racehorse breeding behemoth Coolmore Ireland in 2000. He presently retains the distinction of the most expensive horse in history.

What horse breed is the most expensive?

As far as winning goes, there is no other breed that has finer genes and a winning history than the Thoroughbred. Throughbreds are the most costly horse breed in the world, owing to the fact that they are virtually certain to finish first in any competition.

What is the fastest breed of horse?

The world’s fastest horses, Thoroughbreds, are renowned for their speed and dominance in the horse racing business, whereas Arabian horses are renowned for their intelligence and ability to perform well in endurance riding. Take a look at some of the horse breeds that are utilized in various disciplines like as racing, dressage, and casual riding.

What is the hardest horse to train?

Hot horses have a tendency to respond to lighter touch and to be more apprehensive and afraid than other horses. They don’t often get along with folks who are overly hard on them. You must maintain your composure and assertiveness. The most difficult breeds to ride for someone who is frightened would be a hot blooded horse such as an Arabian, a Thoroughbred, or an Akhal Tekke.

What is the most dangerous horse breed?

Traveling across their domain on horseback, Mustangs represent the greatest threat to those who are uninvited and unaware of their surroundings.

Mustang stallions have been said to have attacked individuals in an attempt to seize their mare, according to legend.

Can I own a lion in Texas?

Texas. Many animals that the state of Texas regards to be hazardous require a license to be kept in one’s possession. Bears, coyotes, chimpanzees and other apes, lions, tigers, and a slew of other animals are included in this group of creatures. It is illegal to harm or harm another animal in the country. This includes monkey, wolf, capybara, ferret, lemur, and many more creatures.

Can I own a kangaroo in Texas?

Kangaroo. Kangaroos are lawful to keep in Texas, and there is very little red tape to deal with because they do not fall under the category of Dangerous Wild Animal, as they do in other states.

Can you own a giraffe in Texas?

In twelve states (Delaware, Arizona, Maine, Indiana, Montana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, North Dakota (North Dakota), Pennsylvania (South Dakota), Rhode Island (Rhode Island), and Texas, a permission is required to keep any exotic animal. Giraffes are not recommended as household pets. Giraffes are another animal that need a permit to be kept in the United Kingdom.

Do duck bites hurt?

Duck bites may be painful. It can range from a mild pinch to a powerful grab-and-pull, which can result in bruises if not treated immediately.

Can I own a peacock in Texas?

Peafowl, which includes male peacocks and female peahens, are not native to Texas and are considered a non-native species. At night, peafowl roost in trees and nest on the ground. Peafowl are forest birds that nest on the ground but roost in trees during the day. Peafowl are classified as “exotic fowl” by Texas Parks and Wildlife since they are not native to the state and are thus not protected under federal law.

Can you potty train a duck?

No, it is not possible to toilet train a duck. Instead, you’ll want to either carefully evaluate which portions of your home you want your ducks to have access to, or diaper your ducks, depending on their temperament.

Is 5 acres enough for 2 horses?

Yes, five acres is more than enough growing pasture for two horses or more if you take good care of it and if that is what you want to do with your land. I’ve witnessed far too many instances of beautiful pasture land being neglected and wasted.

How many acres of grass does a horse need?

In general, if you want your horses to be out all of the time and not overgraze a pasture, you’ll need 2 to 4 acres for each horse. In most cases, however, farm owners do not have this kind of acreage, but with more intensive grazing management, you can have horses on less acres while still having excellent pastures.

What is the ugliest horse in the world?

El Rey Magnum, a young Arabian horse, sparked debate among veterinarians when he was euthanized. The colt has an exaggerated dish to its face, which is a characteristic that is distinctive to the breed, but not to the degree that is demonstrated. Veterinarians are concerned about the 2017 colt because of his unusually dished face, which they fear might be hazardous.

Is it expensive to maintain a horse?

According to the money advice website Money Crashers, caring for a horse may cost anywhere from $200 to $325 every month, for a total yearly cost of $3,876, on average. Some of these expenses are as follows: Grain/feed. Hay.

How Much Does a Horse Cost?

Over 7.2 million Americans own horses, with the majority of them being used for recreational activities such as riding, displaying, racing, and working.

Many people assume that owning a horse is too expensive, but the reality is that it is more affordable than you may expect. Related:Horses

How Much Does a Horse Cost Initially?

Purchase prices for horses can range from $100 to $10,000, depending on the horse breed’s lineage, how you want to utilize the horse, and your geographic region. The average cost of a hobby horse is around $3,000 dollars. Horse breeds with the highest price tags may cost up to $250,000, according to the website Seriously Equestrian. The following are the most costly breeds:

  • Arabians, Thoroughbreds, Andalusian horses, Dutch Warmblood horses, Oldenburg horses

The following are the cheapest horse breeds: Yes, Arabians and Thoroughbreds may command a high price depending on their lineage or be available for as little as $1,000. The wild Mustang, on the other hand, is the most inexpensive breed. Wild Mustangs are normally available for purchase for between $100 and $200, depending on where you reside. Horses have a long life span, as can be seen above. IMG TEXT IN ALTERNATE FORM: You’ll need to either purchase or rent land in order to keep your horse.

How Maintenance Costs Affect the Price

Following the purchase of your horse, you will incur a number of upkeep fees associated with horse ownership. The following are the most frequent expenditures, excluding the cost of purchasing your home:

Boarding

The cost of keeping and boarding your horse might vary depending on where you live and how you board your horse. If you keep your horse in a pasture, the expense will be modest to none. Alternatively, you may board your horse in a full-service stall with daily turnout for exercise. A full-service stall might cost between $400 and $2500 per month, depending on where you reside.

Feed

A horse requires 15-20 pounds of food every day to maintain its health. A well-balanced diet will cost approximately$850 per year to feed your horse on a yearly basis. Your horse need a healthy balance of the following:

  • A horse consumes approximately.5 percent of its body weight in grain mix every day. Hay (grass): A horse consumes around 1.5 percent of its body weight in hay every day. Depending on where you live and whether or not there is pasture available, hay might be expensive. Salt and minerals: Your horse need around two 5 lb blocks of salt and minerals each year. In most cases, a salt and mineral block will cost between $10 and $25.

You may also want to consider supplementing your horse’s diet with additional minerals to aid with digestion. In order to promote the health and performance of your horse, Rogue Pet Science provides theirOrigins Equine 5in1 horse supplement. A simple to use pelleted supplement that contains probiotics, prebiotics, digestive enzymes, and butyric acid to enhance your horse’s gut health and digestion, the Origins Equine 5in1 meal topper is a great choice for you and your horse.

Origins Equine 5in1

If you want to improve the health and performance of your horse, Rogue Pet Science provides their Origins Equine 5in1 horse supplement. A simple to use pelleted supplement that contains probiotics, prebiotics, digestive enzymes, and butyric acid to enhance your horse’s gut health and digestion, the Origins Equine 5in1 meal topper is a great choice for you and your horse. Would your horse benefit from a mineral supplement that is completely natural? Learn more about the Origins Equine 5in1 supplement from Rogue Pet Science in the Frequently Asked Questions.

Health Care

You’ll also need to take your horse to the veterinarian for the following reasons:

  • Deworming twice a year
  • Vaccinations
  • Coggins Test and Health Certificates
  • And other preventative measures

The cost of these veterinary care will range between $250 and $500 each year.

If you decide to breed your horse, you will need to have more health exams and post-natal care because the number of foals will grow. Vaccinations and deworming treatments for your horse are critical to ensuring that he stays healthy and lives a long time.

Farrier Costs

If you want to save money on farrier costs, trimming your horse’s hooves every eight weeks is a more cost-effective option to shoeing. Farrier services, on the other hand, may be more expensive depending on your location. This normally costs around $390 per year.

Bedding

Depending on where you reside, you may need to provide your horse with additional bedding. The expense of straw bedding for a horse stall might reach $400 each year.

Equipment

The cost of equipment may vary based on how you want to utilize your horse. The majority of horse owners purchase:

  • Manure spreader, arena drag, small utility vehicle, horse trailer, and truck
  • Riding equipment
  • Training equipment
  • Grooming equipment

The cost of various pieces of equipment will vary depending on personal taste, use, and brand.

Other Ownership and Operating Costs

It is also necessary to consider other costs associated with keeping a horse that relate to your property, barn, and equipment. Depending on where you keep your horse, you may be required to pay annual fees for insurance, taxes, and interest. In addition, you’ll be responsible for doing routine maintenance and repairs on your fences, barn, and equipment when problems arise. You’ll also need to keep up with the upkeep of your pasture, water tub, and other horse-related equipment in order to keep your horse happy and healthy.

Once you have purchased your horse, you will have to spend between $2500 and $3800 every year to keep him in good condition.

If you decide to hire a stall, you’ll have to factor in additional expenses.

Owning a Horse Can Be Very Rewarding

While it may cost around $6,000 in the first year of ownership (including the horse’s purchase price), having a horse may improve your quality of life and recreational opportunities. In addition, as you learn how to properly care for your horse, you’ll discover techniques to make horse ownership more cost-effective. In the event that you have an adequate pasture and stable facilities on your land, keeping a horse might be a pretty inexpensive endeavor. Additionally, the state in which you reside might have a significant impact on the expense of owning a horse.

Rogue Pet Science manufactures natural, high-quality, and nutritional horse supplements that help to enhance the coat and digestion of your horse.

Contact us now.

EPM in Horses: What It Is, What Causes It, and How to Prevent It References:

How Much Does a Horse Cost? (Buy, Board, Training, Insurance & Daily Costs)

Before you purchase a horse, you should research how much a horse costs and determine your financial capabilities. Believe it or not, it is not as exclusive as many people believe it to be anymore. In reality, about 7.2 million Americans are responsible for the upkeep of their horses. Despite the fact that owning a horse is a costly investment, the direct expenditures you must consider include the state in where you live and the manner in which you choose to care for your animal.

There are significant differences between owning a ranch in Texas and living in New York and needing to locate adequate accommodations for your horse. Let’s have a look at this.

The Costs of Horse Ownership

It is difficult to estimate how much money you will require to purchase a horse. It might be completely free, or it can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars or even millions of dollars to obtain the greatest animals. If you are new to this activity, it will be sufficient to set aside $5,000 to $10,000 in order to purchase a respectable horse. The final price of a horse will be determined by the following factors:

  • Your location
  • The horse’s breed, pedigree, age, sex, health state, purpose, and training level
  • And any other information you may provide. Animals that are available

An average horse for riding practice is typically priced at $4,250, which is a reasonable estimate.

Purchasing process

It is unfortunate that the amount you must pay for your new horse is not the only expenditure you will be responsible for. It is advised that you begin with a pre-purchase examination first. You must get the horse examined by a veterinarian to ensure that it is in good health. Despite the fact that you have a more affordable two-stage vetting procedure, the complete and more thorough five-stage vetting process is the more secure alternative and will provide you with all of the pertinent information about the horse’s health and condition.

  1. The following step is to arrange for transportation.
  2. If you are hauling your own trailer, you will need to purchase gasoline.
  3. Keep in mind that if you want to travel over state borders, you will be required to present a health certificate as well as a Coggins test.
  4. If you need to travel across two borders, you will need to meet the standards for each state line you will be crossing.

Costs After Buying a Horse

As you can expect, boarding prices are substantial, but they also vary greatly according on the boarding facility. The type of shelter you pick is always determined by the horse, its intended use and quality, as well as your financial constraints. Keep in mind that the cost of a boarding facility or stable will vary based on the location where you reside, whether you want full or partial care, and how much attention is paid to feeding and cleaning the animals. When you require comprehensive care, you may expect to spend roughly $250 to $500 each month on an average.

So, let’s have a look at some of your alternatives for keeping your horse happy and safe:

Annual costs for a horse

Purpose Overall costs
Horse $4,000 on average
Purchasing process $850 to $900
Housing $1,200 to $9,000
Feeding Up to $3,650 for hay and up to $1,500 for grain
Supplements $840
Salt block $14
Equipment $265
Tack $740
Rider training $2,800
Horse training $600
Professional help $250
Farrier $450 to $2,800
Veterinary care $200 to $550
Vaccines $95
Dentist $100 to $250
Deworming $30
Insurance $400 to $1,000
End of life cost $600 to $4,000

Full board

When you pay for a stall with included stall cleaning, food, water, feeding, turnout, energy costs, and maintenance, you are referred to as a full boarder (or full boarder). This option also covers regular farrier, veterinarian, and dental appointments, as well as a percentage of the farm call expenses for each of these services.

You may also apply for trainers and instructors who will work with both you and your horse at the same time. Depending on the arrangement, the total cost ranges from $4,800 to $9,000 each year, or $400 to $750 per month.

Partial board

This option entails paying for a stall that does not include any additional services or facilities. In this situation, you will be responsible for providing food for your horse, feeding it on a regular basis, and cleaning the stall. Staff, on the other hand, can assist you if you reach an arrangement with them. This alternative is less expensive, and you have more control over the care of your horse. It will most likely cost you between $3,000 and $6,000 a year, or between $250 and $500 every month.

Self-care board

In this situation, you will be responsible for the cost of a stall and paddock, but you will not be responsible for the horse’s care. You shouldn’t anticipate any assistance and should be prepared to complete the entire task on your own. As a result, you should purchase feed and shavings, fill the water bucket, feed and turn out the horse, muck stables, and schedule veterinarian and farrier visits as needed. Depending on your location, this arrangement will cost you between $2,400 and $3,600 each year, or $200 and $300 per month.

Pasture board

It is a low-cost option that provides your horse with a wonderful opportunity to spend the entire day outside. Furthermore, it will only cost you $1,200 to $3,600 each year, or $100 to $300 every month. Don’t forget to inspect the pasture for safety and fences, as well as for adequate water and the quality of the sheltering material available.

Your own home

The best solution, in most cases, is to keep your horse on your personal property. Although it is not the most expensive choice available, you should be aware that it is not the most economical alternative available to you. For such a vast amount of land, as well as the requisite horse facilities, you must plan on paying property taxes. For example, a nice arena and fencing will cost you at least $20,000 to purchase and install. Then, for a barn, it is required to add at least $3,000 to $50,000 to the whole cost.

  • $4 to $5 each bag of shavings
  • $20 to $25 for putting up the stall
  • $8 to $20 every week to maintain the stall neat
  • $4 to $5 per bag of shavings
  • $20 to $25 for setting up the stall

Additionally, you must maintain outbuildings on an irregular basis, which may include:

  • Roof replacement, siding painting, fence repair, fertilizing and sowing pastures, and weed control are all examples of what we do.

At the end of the day, you should compute daily costs such as:

  • A truck’s fuel
  • Necessary equipment
  • Tractors
  • Power tools
  • Manure spreaders
  • Etc.

Unfortunately, the list is not complete, and your bills might be really expensive.

General maintenance

When you have a horse on your property, you will have to pay more than $800 in general upkeep, which includes things like:

  • Cleaning and upkeep of the barn
  • Equipment and fencing maintenance
  • Vehicle and trailer maintenance

Horse Tack Cost

The bare essentials for your horse will set you back the following amount:

  • The following items are included: a low-end saddle, a $20 saddle pad, a $60 bridle with reins, $25 stirrups, $30 for a halter and lead rope, $40 for stirrup leathers, $30 for a girth, and $35 for a bit
  • And

All of these goods will total roughly $750 in total cost.

Horse Food Cost

Horse feed expenses can vary greatly based on the breed and kind of horse, as well as your geographic region. A horse weighing 1,000 pounds (453.5 kg) requires around 20 pounds (9 kg) of hay per day to maintain its weight. It costs between $4 and $20 every bale of hay weighing 30 to 50 pounds (13.5 – 22.5 kg), depending on the quality. You will require between $750 and $3,650 every year, according to an educated guess. It’s important to remember that grain and lush pasture might help to lessen the need for hay during certain months.

Because bags of grain weighing 50 pounds (22.5 kg) cost $12 to $35, the total cost of a diet consisting of hay and grain will be around $1,500 per year if you follow the recommended guidelines.

Daily costs for a horse

Daily expenses
One-half bale of hay $3 to $5
Two-cup concentrate servings $1 or more
Supplements $0.17
Salt blocks $0.04
Farrier $0.83
Routine vaccines $0.27
Dentist $0.35
Deworming $0.20

Supplements

There are dozens of various horse supplements available on the market that can help to preserve joints, promote hoof health, and even assist digestion. Their rates range from $0.40 to $5 per day, depending on the service. As a result, these costs range from $30 to $100 each month, or up to $1,200 per year.

Water

As you may guess, a typical horse consumes a significant amount of water each day. If you decide to keep it in the pasture, it will require around 6 gallons (22.7 l) of water every day. A mare nursing a foal, on the other hand, will require at least 20 gallons (75.5 l) of water each day. It is difficult to estimate the cost of water. If you have a well, you will only have to pay $0.06 per month for the water requirements of one horse. The cost of using city water is $2.17 every 748 gallons (2,831.5 l) plus $4 for the meter if you choose to do so.

Vet care

Regular checks, deworming, and vaccines are all part of a horse’s annual vet care regimen (rabies, equine influenza, tetanus). You will be required to pay between $45 and $60 for each appointment, with immunizations costing between $65 and $235 every year. In addition, your animal will require regular dental treatment. In addition to the regular fee of $50 to $175 for tooth filing (teeth floating), you will be charged an additional $45 to $60 for the farm call. The cost of a fecal test is $30, and the cost of an annual deworming is between $20 and $50.

  • The cost of a Coggins test ranges from $35 to $90 dollars.
  • It’s also a good idea to set aside some money for unanticipated medical bills like as injuries, lameness, abscesses, colic, or infections.
  • A first aid package for horses can cost you between $100 and $300.
  • Basically, you have no way of predicting these costs.

Farrier

Your horse will require a routine farrier visit once every 4 to 6 weeks, depending on how much work he puts in. The cost of clipping a horse ranges from $30 to $80 per horse, or around $300 to $800 annually. Front shoes will set you back $75 to $160 every pair, or at the very least $750 to $1,600 per year. To get all four shoes changed on a regular basis, you must pay $95 to $275, or around $950 to 2,750 each year.

Horse Training Cost

Riding lessons are priced between $35 to $75 per hour for conventional sessions, and $50 per hour for individual instruction. As a result, you will need to budget $2,400 every year for this reason.

The horse

Each month, the cost of a training board fluctuates between around $600 and $1,800 dollars.

Traveling trainers often charge between $40 and $75 per hour, but a regular trainer would cost you around $650 per month on average.

Trailer and additional equipment

If you want to get a new two-horse bumper, it will cost you between $15,000 and $30,000, but a used bumper will cost you between $5,000 and $9,000. A new vehicle costs over $50,000, but you can find a secondhand one for as little as $6,000 on Craigslist. Another alternative is to hire a trailer, and the total cost will be determined by the distance traveled and the services required. It is also necessary to purchase certain equipment, thus you should budget for the following:

  • For a medium turnout blanket, the cost is $95
  • For a turnout sheet, the cost is $70. Other costs include: $20 for a bottle of fly spray, $29 for a fly mask, $40 for a grooming package, $20 for shampoo, and so on.

The expected annual expenses for this purpose are around $265.

Horse Insurance Cost

It is advisable to obtain insurance that may be used for the following purposes:

  • Mortality, whether total or restricted
  • Major medical
  • Surgical
  • Personal responsibility
  • A loss of use of one’s own property

Insurance costs are estimated to be $400 to $1,000 per year for a home with a value of at least $15,000.

Summary

As you can see, owning a horse might be quite expensive, yet it is most likely less expensive than you anticipated. The total cost will be determined by the animal you pick, as well as the method of feeding and boarding it. Furthermore, they will differ depending on your location and equipment. On the other side, you might decide to lease a horse if you want a more affordable choice. You may ride it every week for a fair charge, and you won’t have to worry about incurring additional expenses for your own horse.

Texas Horses for Sale

The biggest Texas Horses for Sale website on the Internet may help you find your next horse in Texas! Select a horse breed, discipline, and/or price from the list below, or use the search box to specify the horse breed, discipline, and/or price.

Most Common Horse Breeds For Sale In Texas

While there are several horse breeds in Texas, the following are the most often seen breeds of horses for sale in Texas:

5 Time-Saving Tips When Searching For Horses For Sale In Texas

  1. Stay clear from advertisements that seem too wonderful to be true. When individuals start looking for a horse to buy, they are sometimes pulled into low-cost horse postings that turn out to be a scam or a fraudulent scheme. It is recommended that you think carefully before contacting the vendor of the horse if the quoted price is too low. A $500 friesian horse, for example, is nothing more than click bait, yet a large number of individuals fall victim to this type of fraud on a regular basis. More information about horse scams and fraud warnings may be found by going here. Make a decision on a breed and educate yourself about it. The personality and behavior of different breeds of horses varies, and they respond differently in different situations. You should choose a horse that complements or matches your personality as well as the type of task that they will be performing. To give you an example, American Quarter Horses are known for being submissive and active, but Thoroughbreds are known for being edgy and extremely energetic. Consider the following: what will the horse do? When shopping for a horse in Texas, it is important to consider how the horse will fit into your personal and professional life. Do you want a horse to help you with agricultural chores? Do you want to go horseback riding? Are you looking for a cutting horse? Whatever it is that you require the horse to accomplish, you must seek for those features in horse for sale advertisements. Observe the descriptions of horses for sale to get a clear feel of what the horse is like and how well it has performed in the past
  2. Inquire whether the horse seller has any new images. Yes, you are correct. Unfortunately, many owners do not take current images of their horses before selling them. The photographs you’re looking at on a particular horse ad may be one or two years old, and therefore the best approach to see a prospective horse is to request new photos of the horse. The majority of people nowadays have a smart phone or a phone that is capable of taking and sending images. Maintain a local presence for your company. When searching to purchase a horse in Texas, be sure to first contact horse vendors in your local region to learn more about their offerings. Not only can contacting horse vendors in your neighborhood save you money, but it will also assist you avoid being a victim of a horse scam. Transporting a horse is extremely expensive and time-consuming, particularly when shipping over state lines. As a last recommendation, I urge traveling out to see the horse in person to ensure that this is the horse you want and that it is in good condition.

Icarus JMG

  • Do not fall for advertisements that seem too wonderful to be true. In their search for a horse to purchase, many people were enticed by low-priced horse postings that turn out to be scams or frauds. It is recommended that you think carefully before contacting the horse’s vendor if the quoted price is too high. In this case, a $500 friesian horse is nothing more than a click bait scheme, yet a large number of individuals fall victim to this type of fraud on a regular basis. Continue reading this article for more information about horse phishing scams and fraud warnings. Make a decision on a breed and educate yourself on that particular breed. When it comes to personality and behavior, many breeds of horses are distinct from one another. A horse that fits or matches your personality as well as the type of labor that they’ll be undertaking is important to find. To give you an example, American Quarter Horses are known to be submissive and active, but Thoroughbreds are known to be edgy and extremely energetic. Speculate about the horse’s future behavior. It is important to consider how a horse will fit into your life and career while shopping for a horse in Texas. Is it your dream to have a horse to help you with agricultural chores? Why don’t you try your hand at horseback riding. You’re interested in owning a cutting horse, right? It is necessary to check for certain traits in horse for sale advertisements that match your requirements. Observe the descriptions of horses for sale to obtain a good feel of what the horse is like, as well as what it has previously done
  • Please inquire about new images of horses from the horse vendor. Yes, you are correct. Unfortunately, many owners forget to take updated shots of their horses before selling them. For example, the images you’re viewing on a horse ad may be one or two years old, making it the ideal way to see a potential horse is to request new shots. The majority of people nowadays own a smart phone or a phone that is capable of taking and sending images. Maintain a local presence for your business. Always reach out to horse dealers in your immediate region first when wanting to buy a horse in Texas. You may save money by contacting horse vendors in your region, and you can also avoid being defrauded if you do so. It is extremely expensive and time-consuming to move a horse, especially when it is being transported over state lines. As a last recommendation, I urge coming out to see the horse in person to ensure that this is the horse you want and that it is in good condition.

Jimmy Dean Red

  • Morgan| Gelding | The State of Texas Jimmy is a stunning chestnut gelding with a little star on his chest. He has been saddled, but he has not yet been ridden. This is all due to my procrastination and nothing else. a look at the specifics

Lilliput

  • Connemara| Mare | Texas is a musical composition. Lilli is a little mare with a large heart, and she is a favorite with riders. She has a strong desire to please. Don’t let her diminutive stature fool you
  • She is capable of transporting adults. She certainly is. a look at the specifics

Get Paid to Sell Your Horse

How To Sell Your Horse Fast

Do you wish to sell your horse as soon as possible? We’ve put up a guide to help you understand your options and bring you through the process step by step. Download it now. Read the User’s Guide

Browse Horses For Sale By State

Owning a horse isn’t as expensive as you would imagine — but you should be prepared to spend at least a few thousand dollars if you want to add an equine addition to your family. It is estimated that over 7.2 million people in the United States own horses. Before you invest your money on a new four-legged buddy, you may want to investigate how much money should be set aside for it before you get on your horse. Consider consulting with a financial advisor if you need more general assistance with financial planning — for example, figuring out how to save money to enable you to purchase your horse.

How Much Does it Cost to Buy a Horse?

The sort of horse you choose will have a direct influence on the price you pay. However, in order to establish the cost of the horse, you must first define its purpose. Plan on using it for anything other than recreation? Are you thinking about racing, working, or showcasing it? When opposed to the over 537,000 horses that are used for working purposes, over 3 million are kept only for recreational pursuits. It is not only the function of a horse that determines its worth, but also the quality of its genealogy.

The same as with other sorts of animals you might own, the more time you have to devote to training it, the less it may cost you up front in terms of investment.

Because the cost varies so widely depending on the type of horse and the purpose for purchasing, the cost of a horse is also quite variable.

The cost might range anywhere from a few hundred dollars to several thousand dollars depending on the situation. According to the University of Maine, the average cost for frequent recreational usage is around $3,000 per year.

Costs After Buying a Horse

Even though there is an initial expense connected with purchasing a horse, there are several other fees associated with horse ownership. For example, you’ll need to think about how you’ll transport your horse once you’ve acquired it, as well as how you’ll transport it if you need to move it from where it now resides to other locations, such as shows or races, if that’s necessary. In addition, you’ll want to find out how much it will cost to board your horse. Boarding facilities offer a variety of services, ranging from full-service to self-service, including cleaning and maintaining your horse’s stall.

Inquire with the boarding facility about if they have access to bedding in the event that your horse need it.

  • Feeding: Take into account the cost of grain mix, grass and hay, as well as salt and minerals for your horse’s diet. If your horses have access to pasture, they may not require as much hay as you would otherwise have to purchase. Healthcare: Vaccinations, veterinary visits, tests, and exams are all required to keep your horse’s health in good working order. Remember that horses can become ill, just like humans and other animals, and that if this occurs, they will require adequate treatment, which may include emergency charges. You may also wish to consider purchasing health insurance for your horse
  • This is an additional expense. Providers, equipment, and supplies: If you require specialized riding equipment for recreational purposes, you will be required to pay for it. A saddle, stirrup leathers, and grooming equipment are examples of what you could find in this category. If you want to be a rider, you’ll need a helmet, some riding trousers, and some boots. The following are the requirements for a farrier: Trimming and filing of horse feet is required, and for certain horses, shoes are required. This will necessitate frequent attention
  • Pruning will be required around every eight weeks. Training:If your horse need continuous training or if you are seeking for horse riding instruction, you should consider purchasing lessons.

If you own the property where your horse grazes, you may be eligible for a tax break, or you may be eligible for a tax break since your horse might be classified as a pet.

Investing in Horses

If you enjoy horses but aren’t sure you want to own one for yourself (maybe because you don’t have the time or space to properly care for one), you can invest in horses, especially racehorses, through a variety of methods. You may purchase a stake in a racehorse, which means you stand to gain financially when the horse competes and wins awards. Smarty Jones, the winner of the 2004 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes, was owned by a consortium of people who shared a percentage of the ownership.

Investing in horses is not for everyone.

Bottom Line

You should analyze your costs to see what is paid by facilities and others, and what you are liable for paying yourself. Some of the expenditures may be avoided if you are willing to put in more effort on your own part of the project. For example, if you own a stable where you can keep your horse, you’ll save thousands of dollars in boarding charges every year. Leasing a horse would be a viable alternative to purchasing a horse. A partial lease would allow you to ride the horse only a few days a week while you pay the owner a fee to cover the costs of keeping the animal in good condition on the other days.

Tips for Horse Buying

  • Consider speaking with a financial advisor about the possibility of purchasing or leasing a horse. Finding a financial adviser who is a good fit for your requirements does not have to be complicated. Using SmartAsset’s free tool, you may be matched with financial advisers in your neighborhood in less than five minutes. If you’re ready to be matched with local experts who can assist you in achieving your financial objectives, get started right away. In addition to assessing the expenses of purchasing and maintaining a horse, those expenditures should be evaluated in the context of a comprehensive financial strategy. To assist you in developing your financial plan, there are a variety of services accessible, including software-based resources.

iStock.com/jacoblund, iStock.com/olgaIT, and iStock.com/cmannphoto are credited with the images. Dori Zinn is a well-known author. The personal finance reporter Dori Zinn has been in the business for over a decade. Her work has featured in a variety of media, including Wirecutter, Quartz, Bankrate, Credit Karma, Huffington Post, and others. Student Loan Hero was her previous employer, where she was a writer on the team. Zinn served as president of the Florida chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists for two years, during which time the chapter received the national organization’s “Chapter of the Year” award twice in a row.

Zinn has a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Florida State University. The University of Florida awarded her a bachelor’s degree in business administration, and she presently resides in South Florida.

Annual Cost of Owning a Horse and 6 Alternatives to Buying

Parents of horse enthusiasts should be on the lookout. Once your youngster realizes that he or she wants a pony, it’s only a matter of time until they start begging for one. I should know, since I was once that youngster. Every major event, such as a birthday, Christmas, Easter, or other holiday, all I asked for was a horse. Horses were the subject of my dreams. Toy horses were the only things I could find to play with. So I could envision myself purchasing a saddle and bridle from the local country store, which was one of my favorite outings when growing up.

Horse ownership is expensive, and children are not usually dedicated to a single activity or passion.

Instead, take into consideration the annual expenditures and begin with one of the numerous cost-effective alternatives to purchasing a horse that are available.

The Costs of Horse Ownership

You’re undoubtedly aware that the initial cost of acquiring a horse is little compared to the long-term expenses associated with horse ownership. Consequently, while you may be able to obtain a rescue pony for under two hundred dollars, do not be fooled into thinking that you are getting a bargain. According to the results of a horse-ownership study conducted by the University of Maine, the average yearly cost of horse ownership is $3,876 per horse, with the median cost being $2,419 per horse.

The average annual return on stock advisor recommendations from The Motley Fool is 618 percent.

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Food

If you’re wondering where all of that money is going, a significant amount of it is going toward food. The average horse weighs 1,100 pounds and requires a daily intake of hay and grain averaging 1.5 percent to 2.5 percent of its body weight in order to maintain its health. While a bale of hay or a bag of grain may not cost you back much money, the bale or bag of grain will not last you for very lengthy periods of time. The cost of food alone accounts for around one-third to one-half of the overall cost of horse ownership, amounting to more than $1,000 per year on average.

Vet and Farrier

The combination of veterinary and farrier expenses is another big price to factor in. A horse need regular maintenance and care in the same way that your dog or cat does – and it does it at a far higher expense than caring for a tiny pet. Fees for veterinary treatment alone total around $485 per year, which includes basic check-ups, vaccines, and testing, four yearly dewormings, and minor care for non-emergency accidents, among other things. If your horse requires emergency treatment, you should anticipate vet bills to skyrocket considerably.

Additionally, the expense of foot upkeep must be addressed in addition to veterinarian fees.

Poor hoof care can result in infection, joint hyperextension, and even permanent disability if not addressed immediately.

Trimming costs around $350 per year, however shoeing can cost substantially more, depending on how many hooves are shoed and how often they are changed out.

General Maintenance

If you’re keeping a horse on your own property, you’ll have to spend money on routine upkeep to maintain everything in good condition and working properly. This category includes the upkeep of a barn, stable, or shelter, the maintenance of equipment and fences, and the maintenance of a trailer’s vehicle. If your horse is being kept in an indoor stable, you will also need to provide bedding for it. All things considered, these expenditures pile up. Horse owners should expect to spend more than $800 per year on maintenance, depending on the size of their property and the amount of upkeep necessary.

Boarding

Do you believe that owning a horse is already prohibitively expensive? If you have to board your animal on someone else’s land, the cost increases significantly. Boarding costs are quite variable and depend on the expectations of the boarding facility in question. In certain cases, it may be possible to board your horse in a pasture for less than $100 per month if you do not anticipate your horse to get any exercise, food, or other amenities during his or her stay. As a general rule, though, if you want to board your horse in a stable with food, new bedding, regular exercise, and other facilities, you can expect to pay a significant amount of money.

One-Time or Occasional Expenses

In addition to the continuous expenses associated with horse ownership, there are some one-time or sporadic fees that you should be prepared to pay. For example, you’ll need to acquire horse equipment and grooming materials, such as saddles, bridles, halters, brushes, shampoo, horse blankets, and lead lines, as well as other accessories. Each of them demands an initial outlay of funds and, depending on how they are used, will necessitate periodic upkeep or replacement over time. Another expenditure that is sometimes ignored is training.

  • However, even if you acquire a horse that has already undergone basic training, it may require more training in order to be able to interact well with your child.
  • In the same vein, it’s possible that your youngster may require training.
  • This will make the experience more gratifying for everyone involved.
  • Helmets, riding boots, chaps or riding breeches, spurs or crops, and gloves are just a few of the accessories that your youngster may require when horseback riding.

His or her requirements will vary depending on the sort of riding done and the level of competition, but you should be prepared to budget for and acquire a couple of the items on this list in advance.

Horse Ownership Alternatives

In the event that you’ve counted the statistics and concluded that horse ownership is prohibitively expensive, there are a variety of options to consider. Even if you’d like to provide your son or daughter with a horse or pony, it may not be feasible from a financial standpoint. Try to satisfy your child’s desire for horses by providing opportunities for them to interact with them without the long-term commitment and price of ownership.

1. Horseback Riding Lessons

Look for horseback riding classes and training in your local region by visiting stables in your neighborhood. Learning to ride and do basic horse maintenance under the supervision of a certified instructor is a wonderful way to introduce your child to horseback riding and horse care. A selection of riding styles falling within the general English or Western riding categories are now available for you to pick and choose from as well. Dressage, show jumping, and polo are examples of sub-specialties in English riding, whereas reining, cutting, and rodeo are examples of sub-specialties in Western riding.

The majority of group courses cost between $15 and $50 each lesson, however individual training can cost as much as $100 or more per hour depending on the instructor.

2. 4-H Club

While the majority of 4-H club members own their own animals, it’s still a good idea to contact your local 4-H Horse chapter to see if the horse program has any horses available for young riders to ride with them. Students in grades 3 through 12 can participate in 4-H programs that provide equine training that includes everything from basic horse care to the ins and outs of presenting your horse. If your local branch can give hands-on experience to students who do not have access to horses, it might be the ideal and most cost-effective alternative.

3. Volunteerism

Check with your local stables, horse rescues, and horse therapy programs to see if any of them are need for volunteers at the present time. Horseback riding lessons or riding time are provided by certain groups in return for assistance around the stables. Even if the organization does not give lessons or ride time, your child may still find it rewarding to donate his or her time to groom, wash, and generally care for the horses at the facility.

4. Horse Camp

When summertime rolls around, offer your child the opportunity of a lifetime by enrolling him or her in a summer horse camp program. Day programs are likely to be offered by local stables, while overnight camps provide a more immersive learning experience. A kid is assigned to a horse for a week or two at most horse camps, and the youngster is responsible for caring for, grooming, riding, and feeding the horse while at camp. Because horse camp is the closest thing your child will come to experience horse ownership without actually bringing a horse into your life, it is highly recommended.

To be honest, the name, personality, and affection I shared with a horse at horse camp over two decades ago are still fresh in my mind. Brown Jug will always have a special place in my heart.

5. Horse Loans, Leases, or Shares

Horse loans, leases, and shares are arrangements entered into with a horse owner in order to acquire access to his or her horse. These agreements are a logical step down from horse ownership.

  • Horse Loans are available. A horse loan arrangement requires you to commit to the care and feeding of a horse without the long-term commitment that comes with horse ownership. Horse leases are often arranged for a specific amount of time, during which you are responsible for all of the expenditures associated with ownership, as outlined in the loan agreement
  • They are also known as horse loans. A horse leasing arrangement is quite similar to a horse loan in that it is entered into with the horse owner, and you are responsible for many of the expenditures associated with horse ownership. The only difference is that you are required to pay a monthly fee to the horse owner in exchange for the usage of his or her animal. Horse Shares are similar to a vehicle lease, however they are for horses instead of cars. For situations in which two parties desire to acquire a horse but neither party wants to bear the whole financial burden of ownership, a horse share may be an option. Both parties own the horse and contribute to the costs of care, hence these arrangements are effectively shared ownership agreements

If you decide to pursue a loan, lease, or share, you should consider having an agreement set out by a lawyer in order to safeguard your interests as well as the interests of the other party in the transaction. It’s important to avoid any confusion regarding whose costs are the responsibility of whom.

6. Horse Fostering

Many horses are abandoned, mistreated, or just unloved by their owners, which is a sad reality that must be addressed. Horse rescue groups regularly look for foster homes to assist them in the care of horses that have been surrendered to their care. Horse fostering may be the ideal alternative for you if you have the necessary facilities and space to care for a horse in your house. While rescue groups often cover the majority of the costs of ownership, such as veterinarian fees and training, as well as corrective farrier appointments, foster homes typically cover the price of food, shelter, and other regular care.

  • Adoption of the foster horse is possible at any moment. Before committing to foster care, be certain that your kid understands the dynamics at play. Some of the foster horses are unable to be ridden. The disappointment that your child may experience if you give him or her a horse that is lame, unwell, or untrained may be due to the fact that the horse is placed in your care because of these factors: Some foster horses are not excellent with children, for whatever reason. The majority of horses are not suited for young children, even if they have been broken to ride them. In the same vein, if your youngster desires a horse for riding, he or she may be disappointed.

Fostering is a significant commitment that should not be taken lightly. You are consenting to devote your time, energy, and resources to the care and nourishment of an animal who may be sick or starving as a result of your actions. It’s sure to present some difficulties, but it also has the potential to be one of the most satisfying things you ever accomplish in your life. It is a lovely and heartwarming experience to witness a horse come into your care, regain health, learn to trust humans, and eventually find a forever home for itself.

Final Word

To be honest, if your youngster expresses an interest in owning a horse, you’re unlikely to hear the last of the story. Having said that, there are alternatives to quench the urge by providing frequent horse experiences that do not require the same financial investment as actual horse ownership. Don’t be afraid to explain to your child why you are unable to provide him or her with a horse. Provide him or her with a budget breakdown of the costs and explain that one day, when he or she will have an income, the decision to acquire a horse will be his or hers.

My financial situation has improved enough that I am now able to care for a horse on my own property.

Horses may live for up to 25 years, so unless you’re prepared to spend $3,000 or more every year for the next 20 years, you’re probably not ready to make the commitment to owning a horse.

Are there any additional strategies you employ to keep your youngster happy?

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